Vietnam 'Wild Boar' Black Tea

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Cedar, Dates, Fig, Honey, Black Pepper, Brown Toast, Butter, Camphor, Caramel, Cherry, Chestnut, Clove, Cream, Dark Chocolate, Dark Wood, Dried Fruit, Eucalyptus, Ginger, Malt, Mineral, Pine, Red Apple, Roasted nuts, Walnut, Cocoa, Dark Bittersweet, Fruity, Chocolate, Sweet, Earth, Smooth, Thick, Autumn Leaf Pile, Wood
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by What-Cha
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 2 min, 15 sec 4 g 7 oz / 216 ml

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23 Tasting Notes View all

  • “eastkyteaguy’s endorsement of gongfu-ing this tea gave me the encouragement to give it a try with the last of my sample. I enjoyed the different experience I got from gongfu vs western here, but I...” Read full tasting note
    65
  • “A good replacement when hankering for British teabag “tea”. Well oxidised and quite tannin-y. But much better.” Read full tasting note
    75
  • “Yes, to this tea. It’s like a malty Assam married a Black Dragon pearl tea, and this is their child. It is one I would enjoy everyday. Just tasty, good balance of everything involved. Someone else...” Read full tasting note
    95
  • “I think one thing that comes through when I review Vietnamese teas is that I tend to have a huge soft spot for them. To this point, I have been particularly impressed by the teas What-Cha sources,...” Read full tasting note
    90

From What-Cha

A brilliant wild growing black tea with a rich taste of chocolate and malt.
The wild growing tea leaves are picked by local hill tribes who bring the leaves into town where they are processed. The tea is named after the wild boar which roam the area.

Sourcing
All our Vietnamese teas have been sourced by Geoff Hopkins of Hatvala, who regularly travels Vietnam in search of the best teas, all of which are sourced direct from the tea producers.
It is Hatvala’s mission to raise awareness of the high quality Vietnamese teas which are often overlooked on the world market and it my pleasure to assist by making Hatvala’s full range of Vietnamese teas available on What-Cha.

Tasting Notes:
- Smooth texture
- Rich taste
- Taste of chocolate and malt

Origin: Nui Giang, Yen Bai Province, Vietnam

Tea Trees: Wild growing with an age between 200-800 years old

Tea Varietal: Camellia Sinensis var. Assamica

Altitude: 1400m+

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23 Tasting Notes

65
36 tasting notes

eastkyteaguy’s endorsement of gongfu-ing this tea gave me the encouragement to give it a try with the last of my sample. I enjoyed the different experience I got from gongfu vs western here, but I think I actually prefer western after all in this case. It’s hard to tell if I can be fair to this tea, however — as I mentioned in the previous review, the leaf was pretty well broken up, lots of very small pieces, and as I feared, I think there was a good bit of harshness contributed simply by that fact. It was the end of my sample, too, with inevitably even smaller bits. It could be that a sample with more intact leaf would have fared better.

Anyway, I did 3g/50ml/95 C. Flash rinse was a very pretty red amber, and when I tasted a bit of it, it was surprisingly strong for just a couple seconds’ contact with the leaves. I did 10 steeps in all – 10 seconds to start and adding 5-10 seconds following. Throughout, the dominant aroma and flavor was earthy, woodsy cedar. (Side note: I broke in a new tea tray with this session, and it still smells very strongly of cut wood, which only heightened the aromatic wood notes of this tea!) Pretty astringent, good bit of drying tannins, decent amount of bitterness. In the middle steeps I started to pick up some rosemary or maybe eucalyptus notes, and possibly something very faintly citrus. A bit of minerality in these middle infusions, too. Toward the end I started to get very small hints of cocoa powder and vanilla, but these were not accompanied by any sweetness at all, which was quite interesting. I realized a couple infusions in that I was getting pretty much no sweetness whatever, though I did get some decent sweet notes from this tea in western and cold brew.

What this tea taught me is that I prefer more sweetness of some kind in my black teas. I’ve enjoyed some savory greens that had little to no sweetness, but when it comes to black, I think I need more of that sweet/bitter balance.

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75
13 tasting notes

A good replacement when hankering for British teabag “tea”. Well oxidised and quite tannin-y. But much better.

Flavors: Cedar, Dates, Fig, Honey

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 2 min, 45 sec 2 tsp 7 OZ / 200 ML

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95
328 tasting notes

Yes, to this tea. It’s like a malty Assam married a Black Dragon pearl tea, and this is their child. It is one I would enjoy everyday. Just tasty, good balance of everything involved. Someone else said it didn’t have depth, and I don’t agree. If you like Assams, but don’t want astringency, this is your dream tea!

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 3 min, 0 sec

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90
658 tasting notes

I think one thing that comes through when I review Vietnamese teas is that I tend to have a huge soft spot for them. To this point, I have been particularly impressed by the teas What-Cha sources, and this was yet another winner. Several other reviewers did not find this tea all that complex, but brewing this gongfu, I got quite a bit out of it.

Obviously, I gongfued this tea. After a very quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 203 F water for 5 seconds. This infusion was chased by 14 subsequent infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 7 seconds, 10 seconds, 15 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, and 5 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, I picked up aromas of malt, dark chocolate, prunes, and cedar coming form the dry tea leaves. After the rinse, I detected emerging aromas of roasted nuts, caramel, and dark wood. I couldn’t detect any new aromas on the first proper infusion. On the palate, the liquor was surprisingly strong, astringent, and tannic. I found notes of cedar, dark wood, dark chocolate, malt, caramel, roasted nuts, and prune underscored by vague hints of spice. Subsequent infusions brought out impressions of butter, cream, dates, brown toast, and fig. The roasted nut notes became clearer and started to separate a bit, reminding me of a combination of chestnut, beechnut, hickory, and black walnut. I also began to note subtler impressions of pine needles, eucalyptus, camphor, minerals, red apple, and tart cherry, while the spice notes began to grow stronger and resemble a combination of ginger, black pepper, and clove. The later infusions mostly offered notes of minerals, malt, brown toast, dark wood, and cream underscored by hints of roasted nuts, cooling herbs, gentle spices, and touch of fruitiness.

It’s no secret that I love malty, rich black teas and this was that sort of tea. I found that it displayed admirable longevity in a gongfu session and brewed up with much greater depth and complexity than expected. All in all, I thought this was an excellent black tea and would not hesitate to recommend it to fans of such teas.

Flavors: Black Pepper, Brown Toast, Butter, Camphor, Caramel, Cedar, Cherry, Chestnut, Clove, Cream, Dark Chocolate, Dark Wood, Dates, Dried Fruit, Eucalyptus, Fig, Ginger, Malt, Mineral, Pine, Red Apple, Roasted nuts, Walnut

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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81
21 tasting notes

2.5g for 2.5 minutes in 300ml of water just off the boil. Re-steeps well at 4 minutes.

This is a surprising tea. It’s a nice strong cup of tea but smooth and without any of the astringency I usually expect with a stronger hongcha. Thick mouthfeel almost like a bulang shou. Not the most complex but very satisfying for when you want a nice strong cup. Notes of cocoa dominate with an underlying sweetness that is somewhat obscurbed by the slight bitterness from the cocoa. Not getting much malt from this one unlike other reviews. I’ve been drinking this on and off for the last few weeks. It will never be a favourite as its a bit monodimensional but its something I think I’d like to have on hand for when I want a stronger hongcha.

I think this would make for a good option for those looking for a loose leaf alternative to bagged english breakfast teas. Will introduce this to family members who enjoy a splash of milk in their tea as I think it will hold up well to it.

Flavors: Cocoa, Dark Bittersweet

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 2 min, 30 sec 2 g 10 OZ / 300 ML

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87
1 tasting notes

First time with an unflavored tea (No fruit/flowers/sweetners added.)

Great notes of dark chocolate, malt, and Autumn leaves. A bit bitter, but that may just be my untrained palette. Felt thick on the mouth and throat, and definitely could have went longer than the 5 steepings I did.

Flavors: Dark Bittersweet, Dark Chocolate, Malt

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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77 tasting notes

Another nice tea from What-Cha.

The malt was very present, thick mouth feel yet smooth with chocolate notes.

It isn’t a complex tea, rather reminds me of a strong British cuppa people enjoy in the afternoon.

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81
6734 tasting notes

This is a queued tasting note.

Gong Fu/Stream of Consciousness style review:

5 sec rinse and rest…

5 sec
- Slight astringency + thick mouthfeel
- Thick malt top notes
- Body/finish = Rye, raisin, cocoa

7 sec
- Much the same as previous steep
- Perhaps more sweetness and more overall cocoa

10 sec
- Definitely feels more well rounded
- Malt/cocoa/honey/red fruits
- Lingering sweet finish

12 sec
- Top notes of honey and red fruits
- Raisin/malt slowly creep in
- Sweetness has a clean finish
- Malt lingers

15 sec
- Clean, sweet, fruity top notes
- Intro. of cane sugar notes??
- Otherwise pretty much the same as previous infusion

18 sec
- Malt, raisin, cocoa, red fruit, cane sugar, honey, caramel
- Feels quite well rounded and sweet now

25 sec
- Yes! Well rounded, clean profile
- Flavour of malt/raisin/cocoa is diminishing
- Which leaves stronger feeling, lovely fruit notes

I felt like this was both the decrescendo of the session as well as the sweet spot, but like often seems to happen I looked at the clock and realized that I had to stop the session to start getting ready for work. I would have loved to see this one through to completion though. It was an otherwise A+ session though, despite a bit of a harsher start.

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60 tasting notes

This tea has such an incredible robustness and richness of flavor that its lack of complexity doesn’t matter. It offers an up front burst of dark malt and unsweetened cocoa with staying power and depth, but also a slight bitterness. Very satisfying, and the first tea I would suggest to a coffee drinker.

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45 tasting notes

This is for the 2016 spring version of this tea.

This is a pretty straight-forward but very satisfying black tea. It reminds me of old arbor black tea from yunnan that is leaning just a bit into the Indian Assam territory. The brew is super smooth and dark, clearly a fully oxidized black. The aroma and flavor are mostly malt but with some fruity sweetness and a tiny carob note.

Edit: After spending a bit more time with this tea, I’m getting a fair bit more fruit and honey than I originally was noticing. Perhaps this is due to having recently been drinking more Assam black tea than fruitier/sweeter blacks, thus the non-malt notes are popping out at me a bit more obviously. This seems to fit nicely between the maltier and fruitier/sweeter side of black teas.

Flavors: Fruity, Honey, Malt

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