China Shandong Laoshan Green Tea

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Green Tea Leaves
Flavors
Butter, Chestnut, Cream, Grass, Green Beans, Honey, Mineral, Peas, Seaweed, Soybean, Spinach, Sugarcane, Toasted, Toasted Rice, Umami, Zucchini, Vegetal
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
160 °F / 71 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 6 oz / 171 ml

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This was another recent sipdown of mine. I finished the last of two sample pouches of this tea last night when I had difficulty settling down and going to sleep. I liked this one much more than I...” Read full tasting note
    87
  • “Got this in a what-Cha sampler. It’s very green and vegetal to me. Mean green. I liked it, but I didn’t like it as much as the black tea or white tea choice in my surprise tea sampler.” Read full tasting note
    58
  • “This is one of my all time favourite teas. It has a really thick roasted kind of taste and it’s very savory. The smell of the dry leaves kind of reminds me of cocao which is really nice, but that...” Read full tasting note
    100
  • “This tea is just so yummy. Savory, mouthwatering and lip smacking. It’s buttery and brothy. No seaweed taste, not grassy, it reminds me of edamame. Provides lovely calm energy. I bought it as a...” Read full tasting note

From What-Cha

A stunning aroma of toasted corn accompanied by a brilliant green bean taste.

Produced by 42 year old Dong Tao on his family farm alongside his wife Wang Yin. Dong Tao has been producing tea for the last two decades and began his tea apprenticeship even earlier, planting tea bushes for his father.

What sets Dong Tao’s teas apart from others in Laoshan, is that he has decided to leave his tea plants fully exposed to the elements year round so they can go through the traditional cycle of alternating temperatures during the winter and summer. Tea bushes experiencing the tough Laoshan winter is part of what gives Laoshan tea its uniqueness.

Tea from Laoshan is gaining very rapidly in reputation due to it’s unique characteristics gained as a result of being grown at a higher latitude than any other tea within China. The high latitude makes it all the more difficult for the tea plants to grow which gives the tea a full and complex taste which is typically only found from high elevation teas which undergo similar strains.

Sourced direct from a friend of Dong Tao.

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

4 Tasting Notes

87
824 tasting notes

This was another recent sipdown of mine. I finished the last of two sample pouches of this tea last night when I had difficulty settling down and going to sleep. I liked this one much more than I expected considering the black tea What-Cha sources from the same producer did not do much for me.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a brief rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 167 F water for 5 seconds. This infusion was chased by 15 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 7 seconds, 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, and 5 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves emitted aromas of toasted corn, soybean, and grass that were underscored by fleeting hints of honey. After the rinse, I noted the emergence of a stronger toasted corn aroma alongside a more delicate roasted chestnut scent. The first infusion introduced aromas of sugarcane and zucchini. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented delicate notes of toasted corn, grass, roasted chestnut, zucchini, and soybean that were underscored by hints of sugarcane, seaweed, and spinach. Scents of seaweed, spinach, and peas emerged on the following infusions. Honey notes appeared in the mouth along with impressions of umami, minerals, toasted rice, butter, peas, cream, and green beans. The final few infusions offered delicate mineral, grass, spinach, and seaweed notes that were balanced by toasted rice, toasted corn, cream, and butter impressions.

This struck me as a very interesting tea. In terms of aroma and flavor, it reminded me of some of the Japanese and Korean green teas with which I have been experimenting. It, however, did retain the strong vegetable and soybean notes as well as the subtle sweetness I often associate with Laoshan green teas. I also must state that I was surprised and impressed by this tea’s longevity. Overall, I found this to be a high quality offering.

Flavors: Butter, Chestnut, Cream, Grass, Green Beans, Honey, Mineral, Peas, Seaweed, Soybean, Spinach, Sugarcane, Toasted, Toasted Rice, Umami, Zucchini

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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58
70 tasting notes

Got this in a what-Cha sampler. It’s very green and vegetal to me. Mean green. I liked it, but I didn’t like it as much as the black tea or white tea choice in my surprise tea sampler.

Flavors: Vegetal

Preparation
1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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100
8 tasting notes

This is one of my all time favourite teas. It has a really thick roasted kind of taste and it’s very savory. The smell of the dry leaves kind of reminds me of cocao which is really nice, but that taste is not present in the actual tea when brewed.

Preparation
160 °F / 71 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 5 OZ / 160 ML

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40 tasting notes

This tea is just so yummy. Savory, mouthwatering and lip smacking. It’s buttery and brothy. No seaweed taste, not grassy, it reminds me of edamame. Provides lovely calm energy. I bought it as a sample, but this is a tea I need. Reminiscent of Verdant’s Laoshan Green, but richer.

Flavors: Butter, Soybean

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