Taiwan Hong Shui Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Almond, Baked Bread, Blackberry, Blueberry, Butter, Caramel, Cedar, Cherry, Chocolate, Cinnamon, Cream, Dried Fruit, Ginger, Grass, Honey, Leather, Licorice, Mineral, Nutmeg, Oats, Peanut, Pear, Pecan, Pine, Raisins, Red Apple, Roasted, Roasted Barley, Smoke, Straw, Toasted Rice, Vanilla, Hay, Green Wood, Iodine, Roasted nuts, Seaweed
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 30 sec 4 g 6 oz / 188 ml

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From Our Community

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5 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I am so happy to be back on Steepster. Work and class have been crazy lately, and quite frankly, I just haven’t had the time or the energy to do any reviews. Fortunately, I am still working my way...” Read full tasting note
    85
  • “I prepared it today in a gaiwan. 3 grams of tea, 85 ml vessel, 30 seconds rinse, steeps: 30 s, 30 s, 40 s, 30 s(first noticed slowly going bland), 40 s, 50 s, 60 s (7 steeps total) I must rate...” Read full tasting note
    95
  • “Thank you Alistair! I liked this one more than I thought I would. I’ve also westerned and grandpa’d teas more than I thought I would, so I could not give you guys a good impression of this tea gong...” Read full tasting note
    85
  • “A——— at What-Cha added this as a sample in my latest order, presumably based on my like for strongly flavoured, well roasted Oolong. Hot and at first steep I got lots of seaweed and iodine. As it...” Read full tasting note
    60

From What-Cha

A smooth and sweet tasting tea with interesting notes of roasted apple and pear.

Tasting Notes:
- Smooth and sweet tasting
- Roasted apple and pear notes

Harvest: Winter 2016
Roasted: April 2017

Origin: Bamboo Mt., Nantou County, Taiwan
Altitude: 350m
Sourced: Specialist tea ‘finisher’ who buys and processes the tea leaves of local farmers

Cultivar: Jin Xuan (TTES #12)
Oxidisation: 35-40%
Roast: Medium (Level 6-7)
Picking: Hand

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 95°C/203°F
- Use 1-2 teaspoons per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 3-4 minutes

Packaging: Non-resealable vacuum-sealed bag packaged in Taiwan

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

5 Tasting Notes

85
779 tasting notes

I am so happy to be back on Steepster. Work and class have been crazy lately, and quite frankly, I just haven’t had the time or the energy to do any reviews. Fortunately, I am still working my way through some of my larger tea purchases, so the backlog isn’t huge these days. I finished what I had of this tea a week or so ago. Prior to trying this tea, I did not have much familiarity with Hong Shui oolongs, so I did not really know how to score it. Overall, though, I found it to be a very nice yet challenging tea.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After the rinse, I steeped 6 grams of dry tea leaves in 4 ounces of 203 F water for 10 seconds. This infusion was followed by 17 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, and 20 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves produced aromas of raisin, prune, pear, cinnamon, and roasted almond. After the rinse, I detected new aromas of vanilla, cream, roasted peanut, butter, and roasted pecan as well as a subtle scent of old leather. The first infusion introduced aromas of cedar, smoke, candied ginger, and nutmeg. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented notes of raisin, prune, honey, cinnamon, roasted almond, vanilla, cream, and butter that were chased by hints of cedar, nutmeg, candied ginger, and pear. There was also a little leatheriness in the mouth after the swallow. The subsequent infusions introduced aromas of blackberry, toasted rice, chocolate, roasted barley, pine, straw, black cherry, and blueberry. Stronger candied ginger, pear, and nutmeg notes came out in the mouth alongside roasted pecan notes. Impressions of minerals, straw, toasted rice, roasted barley, black cherry, oats, chocolate, caramel, blackberry, blueberry, red apple, grass, baked bread, and pine also emerged with hints of licorice and smoke in tow. As the tea faded, the liquor began to emphasize notes of minerals, cream, butter, vanilla, honey, roasted almond, and roasted peanut that were balanced by softer notes of raisin, blackberry, cinnamon, pine, baked bread, toasted rice, grass, and black cherry.

This was a very interesting oolong. Its aroma and flavor components were constantly shifting, rendering the experience of drinking it very difficult for me to accurately describe. In terms of aroma and flavor, it struck me as being almost like a cross between a lighter roasted Shui Xian and a traditional Dong Ding oolong. Anyway, there was a lot going on with this tea. If you are looking for something a little more challenging, this would definitely be a tea to consider.

Flavors: Almond, Baked Bread, Blackberry, Blueberry, Butter, Caramel, Cedar, Cherry, Chocolate, Cinnamon, Cream, Dried Fruit, Ginger, Grass, Honey, Leather, Licorice, Mineral, Nutmeg, Oats, Peanut, Pear, Pecan, Pine, Raisins, Red Apple, Roasted, Roasted Barley, Smoke, Straw, Toasted Rice, Vanilla

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
Evol Ving Ness

Lovely to SEE you back!

Mastress Alita

I know those feels, February ate me alive and I just now feel like I’m getting some of my stride back. Nice to see you back!

eastkyteaguy

Thanks. It’s good to be back.

Daylon R Thomas

I had my break too because of work and sickness. I also had to get my personal laptop fixed, so I had to wait to post…never mind I drank at least six new teas. I gotta say that the Moondrops from What-Cha kicks butt.

LuckyMe

Welcome back! Returning to Steepster after a break is always an invigorating experience for me.

Kittenna

Welcome back!

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95
76 tasting notes

I prepared it today in a gaiwan.
3 grams of tea, 85 ml vessel, 30 seconds rinse, steeps: 30 s, 30 s, 40 s, 30 s(first noticed slowly going bland), 40 s, 50 s, 60 s (7 steeps total)

I must rate this tea higher than last time.

Strong roasted pear flavour with first steeps. Liquor clear and golden. Taste roasted fruits (pear) and lingering. Little notes of hay though, bit caramel flavours. But I like it, it´s quite complex taste.

Flavors: Caramel, Hay, Pear, Roasted

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec 3 g 3 OZ / 85 ML

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85
1084 tasting notes

Thank you Alistair!

I liked this one more than I thought I would. I’ve also westerned and grandpa’d teas more than I thought I would, so I could not give you guys a good impression of this tea gong fu even though I can say it was good.

The dry leaf smell was immensely thick, roasty, and almost glossy like syrup. When I heavily leafed it, the roast dominated the tea amidst a woody backdrop and some moments of nuttiness and cooked red pear. The florals grew out in the later steeps with high leafage as it gradually got a little sweeter. Gong fu, it was buttery. Western with less leafs, it was also very buttery with a little less roast. The fruity pears and florals popped in the second steeps and combined incredibly well with the savory notes pushing me from liking to enjoying it.

I could see myself drinking this one often. I almost prefer it to the Red Buffalo because of its honey sweet fruit notes and its florals, but the roast can be so thick and powerful with the other notes that it makes me think of turpentine…..as weird and crazy as that sounds. Think florals combined with sap and pine wood….nevermind this tea is more on the fruity end when you brew it right. Lesson here: brew less leafs for longer for fruity, more leafs shorter steeps for woody butter. Unless someone objects. I otherwise recommend to try this type of tea at least once, and those who know what they are looking for would be more enamored with this tea.

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60
20 tasting notes

A——— at What-Cha added this as a sample in my latest order, presumably based on my like for strongly flavoured, well roasted Oolong. Hot and at first steep I got lots of seaweed and iodine. As it cooled and in subsequent steeping there’s pear as suggested on the supplier’s site, and also I got a nutty green flavour not unlike roasted acorns.

H tasted turpenes — how to put this delicately? — of the sort smelled when wandering out of Camden or Brixton tube stations. But I didn’t get that at all.

Flavors: Green Wood, Iodine, Pear, Roasted nuts, Seaweed

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 2 min, 30 sec 4 g 7 OZ / 200 ML

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