13 Years Aged Da Hong Pao Rock Oolong

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Chocolate, Dark Bittersweet, Mineral, Roasted, Thick, Wet Wood, Berries, Dark Chocolate, Wood, Almond, Black Currant, Cocoa, Jam, Roasted nuts, Stonefruits, Sweet, Toasty, Wet Rocks, Coffee, Fireplace, Fish Broth, Marzipan, Sour, Wet Earth, Cacao, Baked Bread, Fruity, Berry, Spicy, Cherry, Plums, Whiskey
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec 6 g 15 oz / 429 ml

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10 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Before I begin it should note this tea is now 13 years old and can be found on the website as such. I’m not sure how to entirely feel about this tea it was interesting for the short session it...” Read full tasting note
    72
  • “Very interesting, as it’s more complex than your usual roasty and toasty wuyi tea. Notes of sandalwood, chocolate and berries ; under the chocolatey flavors, the tea is actually quite juicy. The...” Read full tasting note
    90
  • “This tea was harvested in 2006, so it’s 13 years old now. It was a bold, strong roasty-toasty aroma. The roasted flavor is hard to describe because it’s strong roasted flavor but not campfire like...” Read full tasting note
    95
  • “Ohhhh wow I love Da Hong Pao and I had some different ones from different vendors in the last few weeks but this one tastes like the holy grail to me Vanilla, whiskey barrel, some hints of cigars...” Read full tasting note
    95

From Yunnan Sourcing

A lovely aged Da Hong Pao from Wu Yi Mountains in Fujian. This has been lightly roasted three times over the course of nearly a decade and then stored in a good clean condition. The result is a complex tea with powerful cha qi.

The early brews have a strong vanilla and roasted currant aroma. The taste has some roast, some vanilla and mineral rock sweetness. In the later infusions the roasted taste fades more and the fruit, mineral sweetness and velvety smoothness takes center stage. The tea goes 10+ infusions and remains complex and interesting.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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10 Tasting Notes

72
48 tasting notes

Before I begin it should note this tea is now 13 years old and can be found on the website as such. I’m not sure how to entirely feel about this tea it was interesting for the short session it provides invoking a complex mix of sweetness, bitterness and earthy tones on the palate. The session lasted 3 solid steeps after that it diminished fast. I’ll add that I threw in 2 teaspoons of cocoa shells because I felt it would mix well at steep 5 and it gave it a bit more life. For next time I’ll probably throw it in on steep one. It defiantly adds to the flavor profile well.

So can I recommend it? If your ok with a short session, yes. If your like me and drink tea for hours on end throughout the day, no.

Flavors: Chocolate, Dark Bittersweet, Mineral, Roasted, Thick, Wet Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec 7 g 5 OZ / 150 ML
Kittenna

I haven’t considered tossing in some cacao shells with an oolong! That’s brilliant. I should try it.

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90
6 tasting notes

Very interesting, as it’s more complex than your usual roasty and toasty wuyi tea. Notes of sandalwood, chocolate and berries ; under the chocolatey flavors, the tea is actually quite juicy. The tea holds up many infusions.

Flavors: Berries, Dark Chocolate, Wood

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec 6 g 100 OZ / 2957 ML

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95
310 tasting notes

This tea was harvested in 2006, so it’s 13 years old now. It was a bold, strong roasty-toasty aroma. The roasted flavor is hard to describe because it’s strong roasted flavor but not campfire like nor charcoal-y. It’s an embracing roasted flavor, and yet they mention the 5 years one they have even more of that taste. How can that be? This was so toasty and full, all-encompassing and had subtle sweet fruit notes. The roasted flavor was the star but it wasn’t the only player. It has lots of mineral rock sweetness, some dark cocoa bitterness with dried sweet fruit, blackcurrant, red berries, some unique spices, and yummy roasted almonds. The roasted taste mellowed as the infusions went and the fruitiness and minerals came forward to offer their dance but the toasted flavor never let up, never gave up the stage completely. It is a complex cup of tea, very smooth and delicious. The finish is long lasting, interesting… After the last sip, I can still smell the toasty fragrance, a stonefruit exhale through my nose… Or is that roasted currant? It’s kind of like jams or jellies on the exhale. The smooth liquor coming in, the roasted almonds and dried fruits on the exhale, and then the curious feeling on my tongue. As Togo mentioned, a powdery feeling.

Yixing pot, 8g, 212°F, 130ml, rinse, 11 steeps: 10s, 15s, 20s, 25s, 35s, 45s, 55s, 1m5s, 1m15s, 1m30s, 2m.

Flavors: Almond, Black Currant, Cocoa, Dark Bittersweet, Dark Chocolate, Jam, Mineral, Roasted, Roasted nuts, Stonefruits, Sweet, Toasty, Wet Rocks

Preparation
8 g 4 OZ / 110 ML

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95
89 tasting notes

Ohhhh wow I love Da Hong Pao and I had some different ones from different vendors in the last few weeks but this one tastes like the holy grail to me
Vanilla, whiskey barrel, some hints of cigars mixed with peaches

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 14 OZ / 400 ML

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92
345 tasting notes

This is a very interesting and unique experience for me. The dry leaves smell is quite pungent and has some marzipan, almond. On the other hand , in the wet leaf aroma I found some fire, wet earth and dry wood notes. This is a rich, smooth and full bodied tea with quite a lot of complexity. The taste is mostly sweet and mineral, but it has some deep coffee like roastiness, savoury notes like fish broth, light cocoa bitterness, anise & cinnamon spiciness and acidity in the background. In the protracted aftertaste, similar qualitites are present, but motly the sweet bitter, spicy and roasty dominate (in that order). The mouthfeel is velvety, mouth-watering and slightly powdery and dry in the finish.

I just wish the tea would last longer than the ~8 infusions I can get out of it. However, given the price and how strong the flavour is, that’s probably unreasonable to expect.

Flavors: Almond, Cocoa, Coffee, Fireplace, Fish Broth, Marzipan, Mineral, Sour, Sweet, Wet Earth, Wet Rocks, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 0 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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85
167 tasting notes

Another run-in with an aged oolong…

The roast on this is strong, but balanced. Unlike other heavily-roasted oolongs I have had, this one has deep roastiness without assaulting your palate with lighter fluid and charcoal. In fact, it has the depth and richness of a well-roasted coffee.

As for the aging, I suppose it has helped add some depth of flavor. It reminds me of a pu’erh with some age on it, with a lingering base of sweet earthy flavors that help other flavors pop and transition.

So, I certainly did enjoy drinking this tea. For me, though, I still prefer less of a charcoal note so that I have access to finer flavors. This one was so roasty that it really just made me want to grab a cup of coffee.

Also, I’m cheap. At $7 for 25g, I’m paying about $2 per session. Not bad for a treat, but if I’m going to treat myself, I’ll stick with Tie Luo Han, which I thought had a more dynamic experience. For a more economical Wu Yi, I recommend Golden Guan Yin Da Hong Pao or Traditional Roast Shui Xian.
*
Dry Leaf – dry nuttiness like peanut shell, dry spice, cocoa powder, musty fruitiness – some prune, citric tartness, hints at charcoal roast. In preheated vessel – big whallop of charcoal – not super pleasant.

Smell – charcoal roast, peanut shell, hard wood. Again, not really pleasant.

Taste – bold charcoal roast (but not lighter fluid), deep roasted nut, coffee-like. Development has creamy earthiness and minerality that includes some marine savoriness. Aftertaste gives way to melon, citrus tart notes with underlying sweet prune.

tanluwils

The YS Tie Luo Han is probably my favorite oolong they offer. Really well crafted considering the price. Sounds like this one can age a bit more, though. I aged one of YS’s dancongs that was a bit too roasted for 2 years in my closet. It’s incredible what can happen decent leaf is given the right environment.

apefuzz

Absolutely. I just had an experience with some liu bao from YS, which initially tasted just like dirt. After sitting around for a year and half, I decided to try it again – lo and behold! it has a great sweet earthy flavor and even some camphor notes to it. Either it changed or I did, or both, but either way, I’m glad I came back to it.

apefuzz

I should note really quick too – $7 for 25g of Wu Yi is really inexpensive. I’m just super cheap – and I like a lot of leaf with my Wu Yi teas. Anyway, thanks to Scott and YS for offering such great teas at bargain prices.

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52 tasting notes

[UPDATE – I discovered that this tea responds well when you extend the late infusions a great deal (>8 minutes) – the resulting liquid is more concentrated at first, and has a sweet complexity towards the end of the session, finally revealing the stone fruit/peach notes I was hoping to find earlier.]

11 years old now, rather than 9…my first encounter with Da Hong Pao:

Brewed in my porcelain Jingdezhen gaiwan with Los Angeles municipal tap water just off the boil throughout.

5-6 infusions ranging from 5 seconds to 2+ minutes: field drab liquor; ash, river stones, leather, and wood-ear…no stone fruit that I can detect, though a hint of spice appears in later steepings (star anise? pepper?). Woodsy, dry finish.

More one-note than I anticipated, and yielding a shorter session than I hoped (I wonder if this is true of most Wu-Yi teas? I experienced the same thing with the Lapsang souchong I had from Yunnan Sourcing as well)…still, pretty good over-all.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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85
109 tasting notes

I am in a tough spot of mental illness. I am trying to be gentle to myself.

This had cha qi from the first sip. I thought I was imagining things until I looked at the website description and it did indeed mention powerful qi. Perhaps it is from being re-roasted a few times over the course of nearly a decade.

Gongfu’d in my Da Hong Pao yixing. First steep was of roasted mineral water. Subsequent steeps gave way to distinct notes of bourbon and vanilla coke aged in an oak barrel. When the bourbon gave out, last few steeps were of light cola with a dash of honey.

Not something I could drink every day, but what an experience it was!

Evol Ving Ness

<3

I hope this passes quickly and easily.

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26 tasting notes

I am relatively new to drinking roasted oolongs. The information on the YS website says this has been roasted three times over the course of nearly a decade. Despite this, the roasted flavor is not at all overbearing. It has a deep, juicy flavor that lingers on the palatte. It reminds me of coffee, of the first time the furnace is turned on for the winter, of dark bourbon and water. This may be the tea that turns me on to this style.

Flavors: Cherry, Coffee, Plums, Roasted, Stonefruits, Whiskey

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
Rasseru

‘Iron Arhat’ was my favourite of theirs, its worth a try, gongfu with quick steeping it lasted & had creaminess that made it stand out as really nice. http://steepster.com/teas/yunnan-sourcing/40852-tie-luo-han-iron-arhat-premium-wu-yi-shan-rock-oolong-tea

just john

I will add it to my list!

boychik

This yancha should be brewed at 212F

just john

Many of my steeps were probably closer to boiling. Often I start with near boiling water and allow it to reduce in temp. as I progress through steepings. I didn’t refresh the water with this one though allowing it to cool considerably.

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6 tasting notes

As a very big fan of Da Hong Pao, I was excited to try this.
The leaves are very dark, and glisten almost black when wet. This tea has been skilfully roasted, leaving no offending burnt aromas behind, just a lovely strong but not overbearing roast flavor that lingers on in the first 3-4 brews especially, then lifts off to reveal the more delicate and recognisable yancha fruity tastes. A great experience to drink this tea as that transformation happens.
Nice relaxing Cha Qi and goes many rounds gongfu style. It has quickly become a favorite wuyi rock tea for me, as a drinker who would normally favor a lower roast than this. I really appreciate when I can taste and smell a great roast that brings out the best qualities of the tea leaves, without masking them, and rubbing your face in a pile of charcoal and ash.
I have not given this tea a points value. Just try it, the proof is in the cup.

boychik

ok you convinced me getting it ;D Welcome to Steepster!

Darren Adams

Thanks! I think you will definitely enjoy this one.

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