Yi Mei Ren Wu Liang Mountain Yunnan Black Tea * Spring 2017

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Black Tea Leaves
Flavors
Almond, Baked Bread, Black Currant, Blackberry, Blueberry, Butter, Cream, Dark Chocolate, Earth, Honey, Lemon Zest, Malt, Mineral, Orange Zest, Peanut, Pine, Plums, Red Apple, Smoke, Straw, Strawberry, Sugarcane, Violet
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 3 oz / 96 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

5 Images

0 Want it Want it

4 Own it Own it

3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This was one of my sipdowns from August for which I have been needing to post a review. I’ve been polishing off some of the teas that I have had in storage at a steady rate and have unfortunately...” Read full tasting note
    94
  • “quick note for now. Initially extremely malty, but this is then tempered by savoury and floral components, which add complexity. smooth and round. medium-bodied. reminds me a lot of the Ai Lao...” Read full tasting note
    85
  • “When I want a change of pace from the usual tippy golden Yunnan/Fujian black teas, this is what I want. Sure, every once in a great while I’ll look for the Assam I probably have somewhere in my...” Read full tasting note
    88

From Yunnan Sourcing

“Yi Mei Ren” (彝美人) means literally Yi (Minority) Beauty. This tea is named “Yi Mei Ren” as its made from Wu Liang Mountain material, an area inhabited primarily by Yi Minority people and bears similarity to both and oolong and a black tea in its fragrance and taste. Yunnan large-leaf varietal material is used and the tea is wilted and fermented like a black tea, but for a longer period of time with several intervals of vigorously shaking the leaves. This promotes more thorough wilting/fermentation and leads to it’s darker color.

The brewed tea is highly aromatic with a chocolaty sweet taste with no noticeable astringency. The tea liquor is super clear and deep gold with tinges of red if brewed longer. Due to the higher level oxidization this tea can be stored for several years with subtle changes in aroma and flavor.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

94
876 tasting notes

This was one of my sipdowns from August for which I have been needing to post a review. I’ve been polishing off some of the teas that I have had in storage at a steady rate and have unfortunately fallen behind on posting reviews. At this point, all I can really say to introduce my review of this tea is that it was one of the better teas I consumed last month. Actually, this was a very nice Yunnan black tea overall.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 194 F water for 5 seconds. This infusion was followed by 17 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 7 seconds, 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, and 10 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves emitted aromas of honey, roasted almond, straw, pine, smoke, malt, and strawberry. After the rinse, I detected a new roasted peanut aroma. The first infusion brought out scents of sugarcane and orange zest. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented notes of honey, cream, pine, malt, orange zest, roasted almond, and strawberry that were backed by hints of smoke, roasted peanut, sugarcane, and straw. The subsequent infusions introduced aromas of black currant, violet, blackberry, blueberry, Asian pear, lemon zest, butter, and dark chocolate. Notes of minerals, black cherry, blackberry, black currant, butter, plum, violet, blueberry, Asian pear, dark chocolate, and lemon zest appeared in the mouth alongside stronger and more immediately apparent impressions of straw and smoke and hints of earth, red apple, and baked bread. As the tea faded, the liquor emphasized mineral, cream, butter, roasted almond, orange zest, lemon zest, and malt notes that were complimented by hints of pine, plum, Asian pear, red apple, strawberry, blueberry, blackberry, sugarcane, and roasted peanut.

This was an incredibly fun, vibrant black tea that was very approachable and easy to drink despite its respectable depth and complexity. A lot of Yunnan black teas can go heavy on the herbal, woody, creamy, buttery, bready, nutty, and malty notes, but this one was full of rich, sweet fruity impressions that set it apart from many of the other Yunnan black teas I have encountered. Fans of sweeter, fruitier teas would probably really dig this one. Heck, I enjoyed it tremendously and I’m not even all that huge on sweeter teas.

Flavors: Almond, Baked Bread, Black Currant, Blackberry, Blueberry, Butter, Cream, Dark Chocolate, Earth, Honey, Lemon Zest, Malt, Mineral, Orange Zest, Peanut, Pine, Plums, Red Apple, Smoke, Straw, Strawberry, Sugarcane, Violet

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

85
87 tasting notes

quick note for now. Initially extremely malty, but this is then tempered by savoury and floral components, which add complexity. smooth and round. medium-bodied.
reminds me a lot of the Ai Lao black from YS

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 4 OZ / 110 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

88
24 tasting notes

When I want a change of pace from the usual tippy golden Yunnan/Fujian black teas, this is what I want. Sure, every once in a great while I’ll look for the Assam I probably have somewhere in my cupboard, but this tea is a really great Yunnan pure black. It has the complexity of maybe an old arbor black tea, but it’s smoother and also totally different. It resets my brain and briefly rids me of the tendency to assume that stronger is better.

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 3 g 2 OZ / 60 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.