Premium Grade AA Jin Jun Mei Fujian Black Tea of Wu Yi Shan

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Black Tea Leaves
Flavors
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “The aroma from the dry leaf reminded me of sweet pouch tobacco. I’ve seen people describe the taste as malty but I didn’t pick up on that, mostly I got roasted nut and fruity notes. I lost count of...” Read full tasting note
  • “It’s been a while since I actually had this tea; I’m a little behind on my notes. So, I just have some random observations collected from various scraps of paper that had notes on them – the end...” Read full tasting note
    88

From Yunnan Sourcing

Our Premium grade “Jin Jun Mei” is Spring 2017 harvest from the Wu Yi mountains of Fujian. Wu Yi Shan is well know for it’s rock oolongs (like Da Hong Pao, Tie Luo Han and others), and black teas. A long tradition of tea craft in Wu Yi combined with unique soil and growing conditions gives this black tea a special taste.

Small leaf varietal tea leaves are picked wilted and then oxidized in small batches. The tea is sweet and malty and brews a copper red tea soup!

April 2017 Harvest

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2 Tasting Notes

82 tasting notes

The aroma from the dry leaf reminded me of sweet pouch tobacco.

I’ve seen people describe the taste as malty but I didn’t pick up on that, mostly I got roasted nut and fruity notes.

I lost count of the steeps, if I let it sit too long a slight bitterness crept in but it wasn’t unpleasant.

Interesting tea. This was my first Jin Jun Mei and I’d like to try others.

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88
167 tasting notes

It’s been a while since I actually had this tea; I’m a little behind on my notes. So, I just have some random observations collected from various scraps of paper that had notes on them – the end result of my tea sessions coinciding with my two-year old’s tea parties… Anyway, here’s what little sense I could make of them:

My experience changed a bit as I worked through my 50g pouch. My first impressions noted its sweet smokiness, mainly because I wasn’t expecting it. Just based on the color and my impression of Jin Jun Mei, I was expecting a whallop of malt sweetness. Instead, the main flavors where thick roasted nut notes and some sweet smokiness.

As I got to know the tea, though, I wasn’t noting the smokiness nearly at all – that got overshadowed by the prominent nut notes. Beyond this, I was really picking up sweet, fruity flavors, with a little pleasant funkiness (I called this “grape leaf”).

So, it was an engaging tea that made me want to explore it more. Overall, it definitely fits in the “roasted nut” flavor profile of black teas. However, there is some noticeable sweetness and fruitiness that keeps the flavor profile complex and balanced.

*

Dry leaf – mesquite smoke (barbecue), fragrant floral, pollen, molasses, hints of grape leaf and red currant. In preheated vessel – peanut, buttery toffee

Smell – mesquite wood smoke, roasted pecan, dark caramel, pungent floral?/wet wood?

Taste – heavily roasted pecan and hazelnut, grape leaf*, mesquite, brown sugar and malt sweetness; fruity and syrupy finish and aftertaste – grape leaf, mesquite smoke, red currant, molasses and malt.

*Grape leaf – fruity, leafy, musty flavor – some fruit sweetness counteracted by a leafy greenness and slight bitterness. Musty without being earthy.

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