Premium Qimen Black Tea of Huangshan * Spring 2017

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Chocolate, Cocoa, Floral, Lychee, Malt, Natural Pumpkin Spice Flavor, Oats, Sweet
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by icantcookit
Average preparation
Boiling 1 min, 0 sec 4 g 4 oz / 110 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This tea has strong chocolate notes in the smell, supplemented by malt and pumpkin spice. As for the taste, there I notice more of a cocoa bean flavour than chocolate. It is also quite floral for a...” Read full tasting note
    81
  • “After sipping a Hao-Ya yesterday, I’m moving on to a Mao Feng this morning. Of course, you immediately notice the leaf shape is different, the Mao Feng being notably thicker as each is full and...” Read full tasting note

From Yunnan Sourcing

This is a premium grade Qimen (aka Keemun) harvested in Huangshan county of Anhui. Qimen Black Tea (祁门红茶) is among the most famous black teas in China and has been consumed in the west for well over a hundred years. It’s fame is well deserved, and is derived from the unique Huangshan Mao Feng varietal and ideal growing conditions unique to the Huangshan area of Anhui.
Our Qimen Black Tea is a Mao Feng varietal and is also known as 特级香螺.
Qimen Black Tea is delightful to drink, never astringent, it brews up a sweet, chocolatey, and malt tea soup with some light floral notes. The floral taste rather than conflicting with the malty sweetness accentuates it and adds additional dimensions of complexity to this elegant tea.
Spring 2017 Harvest
Harvest Region: Anhui Province, Huangshan Prefecture, Qimen County

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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2 Tasting Notes

81
353 tasting notes

This tea has strong chocolate notes in the smell, supplemented by malt and pumpkin spice. As for the taste, there I notice more of a cocoa bean flavour than chocolate. It is also quite floral for a black tea and somehow evokes the feeling of cold and dry winter days. Overall, it is a sweet affair with very little bitterness or astringency, I think this is a pretty inoffensive tea. All things considered, the closest comparison I could make with regards to taste would be lychee I think. Finally, another strong point of the tea is its full body and silky mouthfeel.

Flavors: Chocolate, Cocoa, Floral, Lychee, Malt, Natural Pumpkin Spice Flavor, Oats, Sweet

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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52 tasting notes

After sipping a Hao-Ya yesterday, I’m moving on to a Mao Feng this morning. Of course, you immediately notice the leaf shape is different, the Mao Feng being notably thicker as each is full and unbroken, tightly twisted into a shape resembling a gnarled and tarred tree branch.

Prepared in my Jian Shui gaiwan, and served in my porcelain tea cup via my glass cha hai. Filtered Santa Monica municipal water just off the boil throughout.

Using a little less tea and a little more time today (infusions starting at 1 minute and slowly increasing from there): safety orange liquor; gentle, faintly malty aroma; wheat and cocoa on the palate with hints of chestnut or pecan in the finish; very clean and energizing without briskness or acidity. Some additional complexity can be coaxed out with longer infusions, with very subtle notes of chewing tobacco, carob, and potting soil emerging in the finish – but this tea has a wonderful clarity if you don’t over-steep.

Preparation
Boiling 1 min, 0 sec 2 tsp 3 OZ / 100 ML

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