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82

Got this in a sample box …it was a lighter yunnan black …very rounded and smooth taste ,had that distinct yunnan hay/oat background tho which was nice. Either the cone I had was dusty or something else because after drinking this I had a bad hay fever like allergy atttack.

Flavors: Hay, Honey

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92

Sipdown!

I’m really looking forward to restocking this once I finish off my GY from RiverTea.

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92

This tea makes me so happy, because I’ve finally found a yunnan gold tea with the same hints of sweetness, smoke, and leather that are in RiverTea’s Golden Yunnan! I’ve been so sad about the demise of RiverTea because it meant I couldn’t get any more of GY, and I’ve been trying lots of Yunnan teas since then to find something that compares.

So far – up until today’s tea! – I’ve been disappointed. I keep getting sweet-potato-ish Yunnans instead of the smoky, leathery goodness like this.

I am beyond the moon with happiness now that I’ve found a replacement! (By the way, KS, you should try this too!)

I also like the fact that this comes in the cone shapes. It’s perfect for a cup, and 2 cones would be perfect for a teapot. I’m seriously considering buying 100g of this – 50 cones in total.

Many, many many thanks to Dexter for sending me this in a swap. Hooray!

Flavors: Leather, Smoke, Sweet

K S

Awesome! I knew someone had to have a similar tea. I love the sweet potato Yunnans too but man, I’m a sucker for smoky leather. I reviewed several Esgreen teas a few years ago. I recall them all being decent enough. I’ll have to give this one a try. Thanks for the heads up.

Dexter

Awesome!!!! Be sure to sign up with an account and to the ESGreen newsletter – you get loyalty points that can be used for dollars off your first order….

Christina

KS, which ones did you review? I’m seriously considering an order and I’d love some recommendations on samples.

K S

Looks like I reviewed 11 of them back in 2013. http://theeverdayteablog.blogspot.com/search/label/Esgreen

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73
drank Lily by ESGREEN
213 tasting notes

This is a really strange tisane. The flowers are large and a beautiful red. They smell like smoked meat, particularly like a beef snack stick, the sort of long… thin snack sausages you can find in nearly every convenience store in the US… like a Slim Jim.

The infusion brews a sort of amber color. The flavor is surprisingly sweeter than I expected, a little bit fruity but more umami, kind of a tomato flavor, with a hint of smoke that follows in the aftertaste. It’s a little bit tangy like hibiscus, but not nearly as bold.

I can’t believe how much I actually enjoy this. It tastes a lot like tomato juice but with a smokey aftertaste. After the smokey aftertaste dies out, the taste left in my mouth reminds me of dried apple chips, especially tart green ones like Granny Smith.

I feel funny rating this tisane higher than the green smiley face on the scale. Haha. I feel kind of nuts for liking this.

Flavors: Meat, Smoked, Tangy, Umami

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 30 sec 2 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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84

ooooh..this is neat! dexter sent this one my way and it’s just neat. it really is like a plum fruity note here..but there’s a molasses like taste as well. kind of like a burnt brown sugar taste. there’s a breadiness to this too…but like bread slathered with molasses. lol just…neat. thanks dex!

Dexter

Interesting this was my least fav of the ESGreen samples I got…

Sil

it was…..neat…different :)

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Last of my ESGreen samples – I saved this one for last because this was the one I was most looking forward to trying.
This isn’t really doing it for me tonight. It’s a bit too finicky, some astringent, and not at all in my preferred flavor profile. If you get the steep just right it is fruity, but it also has some bitter cocoa notes, maybe even a hint of molasses. Just a little oversteeped and it turns really aggressive on the bitter notes, maybe a hint of smoke.
I’m sure this is a quality tea it’s just not for me.
All in all though I’ve been really happy with the samples I got from them. Really liked 3 of the 4 and would consider ordering from them again. LOL I have a BUNCH of loyalty points so I SHOULD order from them again.

OMGsrsly

I keep looking at their tea pots…

OMGsrsly

I posted a couple on FB. I really like the bamboo one, it looks like a local mountain. :D

DeliriumsFrogs

Oh, that teapot, Dexter! So, so beautiful.

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82
drank Dian Hong-Gold Buds-Premium by ESGREEN
6170 tasting notes

Another from dexter this one is a really smooth brew with lots of chocolate notes. This of course falls in to that comment dxter made a while back – about how many of a certain kind of tea do you really need? lol I quite enjoyed this one this morning and it makes me curious to try more es green teas if this is what they are selling. Thanks again for the sample dex!

OMGsrsly

Do you brew all these Western style?

Sil

depends on my mood. I always try to do a western brew because that’s how i take my travel mugs to work. if they don’t work via travel mug/western brew then it’s a harder choice to make in terms of keeping it in my cupboard.

OMGsrsly

Good idea. I’ll try half my samples gong fu and the other half western.

Sil

SO MANY TEAS!

OMGsrsly

Ugh I know.

OMGsrsly

65 that are 20g or less. That’s still 2-3 cups, unless I make GIANT MUGS.

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Tea of choice at work today. This is fantastic. Everything I like in Jin Jun Mei. Sweet, a little bready, a little malty – great tea. The leaves were larger and more fuzzy than I normally see with Jin Jun Mei – all in all a beautiful tea.

I’m two for two with my ESGreen samples – hope the others are as good. Love the yixing I bought from them and the tea is good.

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This was the tea I was drinking at work today. The lesson of the day was “don’t judge a book by it’s cover”.
I opened the samples packages and was immediately disappointed. The leaves were not all gold – about 60-40 gold/black – they weren’t as fuzzy as I would expect from a premium gold bud. Awwww – this isn’t what I was wanting.
It may not be the prettiest gold bud I’ve ever seen, but wow is it tasty. This is a great Dian hong. first couple of steeps are really chocolaty, smooth, sweet – but no starchy sweet potato. Fantastic tea. I’m really sorry that I only ordered samples of this – if I ever order from esgreen again – I’ll be picking more of this up.

TheTeaFairy

Sounds like a treat :-)

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85

I think this is the first tea I’ve ever tried from Zhe Jiang Province, but if this one is indicative of the general quality I would certainly like to try more. This is definitely fruity as the description says, with a bit of brown sugar or molasses-y sweetness at the end of the sip. Overall though, it tastes mostly like a Keemun. A lovely light and fruity Keemun. Yum.
I don’t know if they’re still doing it, but I got free points at ESGreen by creating an account and signing up for their newsletter. Cashing them in I ended up getting my order for only a few dollars. So if you’re planning an order I definitely recommend trying that first.

Flavors: Brown Sugar, Fruity

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec 2 tsp 12 OZ / 354 ML

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90

Damn Good Tea :)
malt, floral, honey, baked bread, bold

yyz

Yum!

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94

The dry leaves of this Wuyi Oolong are very different from other Wuyi Oolongs. They are yellow and olivine in color, rather than the heavily roasted leaves that are usually brown or black. From what I can tell, this tea is not heavily roasted like most other Wuyis. The leaves smell fruity like raisins. I’ve decided to brew this tea in my Yixing pot, which is seasoned for lighter Taiwanese oolongs with a fruity/floral/creamy slant. This should add to the flavor of the pot nicely from what I can gather, despite this is not in the same type of teas I usually brew in this yixing pot. The leaves of this oolong came in a tin and were wrapped in a very thin plastic lining inside the tin. They were packed in very well without much room to move, nor had they been crushed and there were practically no broken pieces of leaf whatsoever. These are very well handled leaves.

DO NOT…. I repeat, DO NOT RINSE THIS TEA. Drink the first infusion. It is where almost all of the most amazing flavor of this tea is. Even a single flash infusion discarded will rid this tea of its most incredible qualities. You’ll be missing out on the reason it is so good. Trust me. Drink the first infusion.

The smell of the leaves after sitting for a minute in the warm Yixing pot is heavenly. It mostly smells of toasted almonds and honey, or an almost horchata kind of smell, creamy and mildly spiced. After a 10 second infusion, the leaves smell fruity again, with notes of fig and plum and a strong mineral smell that is to be expected from a Wuyi rock oolong. The tea is a subdued yellow and looks slightly hazy, not cloudy. It isn’t as if there is particulate floating in the tea, it is more like the haze you see from tiny fluffy hairs floating in the liquor of really downy teas.

The tea smells like warm vanilla pudding. The flavor is incredibly complex, with a little more tanginess and mineral quality than i’d expect. It contrasts the aroma so that as you take sips and breathe in between, you get an alternation between the sweet vanilla cream scent and the mildly vegetal corn-like, nutty, creamy, yet slightly tangy tasting tea.

Legend has it that this tea gets its name (which means White Cockscomb) from a moment in time when a monk witnessed a rooster fight an eagle to defend its baby. The rooster, sadly, did not live. In memory of the rooster’s brave sacrifice, the monk buried the rooster’s body in respect and a tea tree sprouted and grew from that spot. This was the first Bai Ji Guan tree, from which all others today are derived.

If ever a tea legend seemed palpable to me, it’s this one. This tea is so complex and graceful, it feels like it could be an expression of a beautiful spirit, a legendary rooster’s swansong. The nature of it is unlike any other food or drink I have experienced. It is otherworldly.

It can be difficult as a tea reviewer to not get caught up in the hype and reputations of a tea, especially when it comes with a serious price tag (shipping costs considered, this tea was close to $1 a gram). It can be hard not to want a tea to be good so badly due to all this that you actually perceive it as something more pristine than it is.

But there are teas that come in huge bags for a few bucks that are incredible, and there are teas that come in small tins for a large sum that are incredible. I try not to consider these things at all when I sit down to have a tea. I clear my mind and focus on the tea alone, not how I got it or what I’ve heard of it. All that considered, this tea is an exceptional work of art on its own.

The second infusion is the same color as the first, with a lot more mineral quality emerging. The brew still smells a bit of vanilla but the flavor of it is more on the tart and tangy side, similar to pineapple or other fruits that are slightly astringent. There’s still a backdrop of cream and nuts, but it is in the background now below the mineral and tangier flavors.

The third infusion is similar to the second, but even more mineral-heavy, tasting more like a roasted oolong, though with the yellow color of the infusion I don’t think this is very heavily roasted tea. The leaves have brewed up a nice green color with red-brown tinged edges.

Over the next few infusions the mineral taste remained strong, but by the sixth or so it died off to a light and fruity taste with a syrupy consistency, like white wine, sharing some of the flavor profile of second flush Darjeeling teas, especially with the hints of grape.

While I think the first infusion is the real show-stealer with this tea, it’s still a nice journey and one I definitely recommend if you can afford it (or rack up some Green Points to spend on it on ESGreen, like I did, or go halfsies with a friend).

Flavors: Almond, Corn Husk, Cream, Green, Honey, Mineral, Tangy, Vanilla

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 10 g 6 OZ / 170 ML
Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

Hehe, do not rinse indeed, it would be like pouring money away (not that I ever rinse oolongs anyway :P )

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97

No notes yet. Add one?

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C

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drank Roselle-Hibiscus by ESGREEN
2809 tasting notes

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After the disappointment with the Huangshan Maofeng, I made sure to wait a while before tasting this for the first time. The first session took place a week or so ago and the pu’er aromatics were mostly absent at that point. Today I re-tasted this Dian hong and could not detect pu’er tainting, but still came to the same general conclusion: I am not a fan.

It is completely possible that I’m being a spoiled brat after tasting the two top grades of Dian hong first (specifically Verdant Tea’s “Golden Fleece” and Teavivire’s “Golden Tip”) before drinking the lower quality stuff. But indeed, this is low quality stuff. Just from the dry leaves I can see all kinds of random treasures that shouldn’t necessarily be there and provide inconsistency: tons of twigs and off-color leaves/stems. The wet leaves provide more insight: to one extreme, a green-colored stem-bud combination that seemed to have escaped processing all together, and overly processed broken leaves to the next extreme. They smell somewhat artificial and highly pungent, masking the yam-like qualities Dian hongs are known for. Subtle aromas of chocolate and malt are present, but I am left grasping for them when it comes to the liquor.

The liquor is ruddy and cloudy in all but the first steep, which has decent clarity. The flavor is aggressive and potent, which by itself is not terrible, but it’s much too metallic for me and leaves a drying aftertaste. There are some nice peppery notes available that are enjoyable on their own, but I can’t really find a base for all the rough flavors floating around, making the brew seem unstable. I can imagine this might be decent to use as a blend as ESGREEN suggests in their description, perhaps to add depth and roughness, but I find it unpleasant on its own. Given a current price of less than four dollars per two ounces, I suppose I shouldn’t complain.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C
K S

This one I enjoyed quite a bit. I agree it is no golden tips but then it isn’t supposed to be. As an everyday Yunnan I thought it was very good.

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Ummm, I hate to say this, but this tea was really tainted on its way here. The ESGREEN samples this time around consisted of pu’er, a black tea, and this maofeng. I’m sure you can guess what occurred. Into the fourth steep one of the main flavors is still like young sheng and the wet leaves smell like spent sheng leaves. It certainly fades from the first steep which just tasted like diluted, vegetal sheng pu’er, but the heavy aromas of aged tea really seeped into these leaves during the months of travel and nothing but a single layer of plastic to shield them.

I used half the sample for this review, so I’ll let the rest air out for a while before I taste this tea again, but I believe the damage is already done. However, there are some things I can speak of that were not affected. While the dry leaves are somewhat faded in coloration, they seem to have been made from decent quality material. Downy hairs are clearly noticeable on many and once wet, the appearance is brought back to life with bright greens and delicate small leaves. Few mottled leaves or odd colors present. While many are broken, they are generally broken in half or quarters, so most of it is probably due to crumbling during shipping. This is opposed to chunks missing from sides of leaves or holes in the middle of them. The serrated edges are very much intact as well.

Addendum:
The above I wrote about a month ago. After this much time of airing out and also tasting another lovely Huangshan Maofeng from Teavivre, I went back to this tea and gave it another shot. Thankfully, it wasn’t like I was drinking shengpu-flavored green tea, but unfortunately, there was nothing else left. The scents of smoke and young shengpu are still caught up in the wet leaves and aroma of the liquor in the first two steeps, but the flavor is practically absent. Long two-minute steeps in the gaiwan provided no remedy, only bitter water. It’s impossible to taste any of the sweet, vegetal, and nutty qualities that I now love about this type of green tea. ESGREEN should definitely reevaluate either their shipping methods or their tea choices when sending samples. The all heicha/pu’ercha sample packs in the past worked well, but this past round was just a good way to ruin what probably could have been a decent green tea.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C
K S

I apparently never reviewed this one on Steepster. My notes show I was confused as to whether it was a green or a sheng. I also caught smoke. This was my first of this type tea. I had no idea it was tainted. I requested the TeaVivre version on purpose to try and see if it was the tea or the type. Loved the TeaVivre. This one not so much.

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I tried this sample from Esgreen twice: once on my own with notes and once with a close friend who enjoys pu’ercha during our weekly weiqi session.

I have mixed opinions on this tea. The flavor is interesting, and although the profile is strange for sheng, it’s pleasant enough. The smoky Lapsang-esque aromatics are very apparent, and seem far too potent to suggest natural nuances from the leaves themselves. It may hint at “yan wei,” or smokiness resulting from wood stove drying as opposed to sun drying. This is usually caused when the leaves are dried during the summer months, when the rainy skies prevent the leaves to be dried outside by sunlight, and these summer shengs are generally considered to be lower quality. I won’t pretend to know whether or not that is true for this sheng, but the unbalance of the smoke seems to come from the exterior of the leaf rather than the interior (cf. the Esgreen 2008 sheng zhuan sample from this round, which is also smoky, but does not taste as “smoked”).

The sweetness brought on by the buds is apparent. Besides woody flavors that are more noticeable in the beginning of the session, fruity and sweet floral flavors abound. However, there is a serious lack of power in the leaves. The amount of small leaves and buds may account for both of these features. Considering an age of only about two years for these cakes, the serious lack of texture and absence of throaty kuwei is concerning. The liquor is mild and presents an almost indiscernible cha qi, sitting somewhat unpleasantly in the stomach. The aftertaste is sweet, and there is a very slight bitterness present. I would not say that this is one of the strong points, however.

With sweetness and smokiness being the most noteworthy aspects of this very young sheng, I would not consider storing this for aging. Besides flavor, which begins wearing off after five steeps, this sheng provides a pretty boring session and doesn’t have much else to it.

Preparation
Boiling

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call me weird but of all the teas i tried in chinatown, i liked this one the best :)

unlike other herbs, this has an unexpected sweet aftertaste. like green tea, it can turn bitter when left to steep too long.

my aunt also likes this tea a lot and offered to buy it off me for twice the price, haha. im not sure if she meant it.

so i checked this out and it should not be taken by pregnant/breastfeeding women or if you are taking immunodepressant or blood clotting drugs or are scheduled for surgery in the next couple weeks.

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I am torn on this one. It is very bright metallic (aluminum) tasting at times to the point sweetener barely calms it down. On the other hand it has a smoky layer underneath and is developing leather horsey notes. At times it smells green then it smells barnyard. I think a while longer in storage and this will be a nice one. Of course I don’t have the experience to know that. No rating. I drank on it all day and couldn’t decide.

JC

Since it is a sheng and smells ‘weird’ by your description. If you are going to give it a go at storage make sure that you store it completely separated from others (avoid cross contamination with scent). How was it packed?

K S

Weird isn’t exactly what I meant. It is more like young but starting to age. I like barnyard. This is just a sample packed in a clear baggie. Maybe aging a sample isn’t practical. I don’t know. Is there a type paper I could use to wrap my various samples that I can get at Walmart?

JC

Well, its not very common for a Sheng to smell like barnyard, maybe herbaceous. That’s why I asked. I don’t like to ship Puerh in plastic unless there’s going to be a small frame between the shipping and opening. I would suggest you to let it ‘breath’ for 3-4 days in open air but no direct sunlight. Then retry it.

K S

Am I totally off in my thinking that aged sheng is what shu is trying to emulate? I just assumed this was starting to naturally gain an aged smell and taste.

JC

It is! But it truly never gets there. I guess after maybe 60-70 years? I had 40-45yr old Puerh… you can see where it is going, but you still understand is not really going to get there. (I appreciated the aged tea, I don’t think is worth spending the money in tea that old unless you drink to then boast about it. There’s amazing Puerh out there, and 10-20 years make amazing changes.) Let it air, retry it. It may be also differences in what ‘barnyard’ is to each of us. To me is more of dried hay that was exposed to some mud after a few animals walked by.

JC

Ok, let me take back some of that before I’m ‘attacked’ lol. If you have the money and enjoy really old tea, then it IS worth it. Worthy, is a word of perception and opinion. There :)

K S

:) You’ll not likely ever find one in my tea drawer. I’d rather make the house payment.

JC

hahahaha! Same here. It was an ‘experience’ I feel like I’d rather buy something ‘semi-aged’ (one for drinking and one for storage) and just pray I make it in life long enough to enjoy one extremely well aged.

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This one was nice to look at, Everybody took a sip but none of us actually drank it, We put it in the middle of the table in a wine glass and watched it open and enjoyed just looking at it :)

http://toadsteablog.blogspot.com/

K S

I thought this one was a bit, I don’t know, just ok, to look at. It tasted good though. I wondered if mine was tied wrong or something.

Thomas Edward(Toad)

Ours looked like a big green mutated hundred legged spider with a flower on top, we enjoyed it tho. I poured it out in the front yard finally and a few days later it scared the hell out of me I actually thought it was a huge Spider lol

K S

Guess mine wasn’t tied wrong as a spider is exactly what I thought it looked like. I hate spiders. There was a monster of a spider on the jamb of the garage door this evening right at the back of my car. It is a tight squeeze between the frame and my car. I stood there looking at it for a long time before I finally held my breath and ran. I hate spiders.

Thomas Edward(Toad)

I would have gone right back inside the house lol

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Wow, this is the oldest raw Pu Erh I’ve drank so far (second oldest was like 2001-2003 vintage), but on the other hand I find mellow ripe Pu Erhs more appealing. Dry leaf looks fascinating – long, twisted with rust-coppery texture and minimal leaf brake. You could tell by its appearance that it wasn’t handled much. With a short hot breath blowing onto leaves I definitely noticed dusty dryness with earthy and mewllow backtone and a floral hint (which was quite surprising).

I’m inexperienced with raw variants and not familiar with water temperature appropriate for brewing it but I read that lower temperature is used for younger raw Pu Erhs and close to boiling for older ones. Since I got a 6-7 gram sample of 1997 vintage I really couldn’t experiment much so I decided that I’ll use 3 grams with 100ml water on 95 Celsius. It would be nice if ESGREEN could provide brewing instrucions.

Infusions: 10, 10, 12, 14, 16, 20, 25, 30, 40, 60, 120, 180

Fifteen years is a lot for loose-leaf Pu Erh when you think about it, there’s got to be a lot dust in it so I rinsed it three times. First infusion was somewhat light half-murky caramel tone with faint aroma and heavy (but nut overpowering) acidic taste and light tobbaco finish. Second infusion seemed to awaken the leaf (maybe I should go for four rinses instead?) and brought out a deeper caramel tone wile giving away of not-so-desired wet and stale notes.

However, I did enjoy it more than first infusion since acidic profile settled a bit and made a way for some new, but faint notes to appear. Liquor is silky on tongue and the same tobbaco finish with addition of tinglinkg sensation on tongue. Third infusion is more of what I anticipated – deeper tone with hint of acid (or should I call it sour?), nice boost on tobbacco followed by just a hint of bitterness and dry finish. After few sips I also noticed that some faint notes of… clay? It reminds me of eating a stew from unglazed clay pots.
On fourth steep is where the party started, clay notes blended with those of tobbacco and it reminded me of some better Pu Erhs I’ve tasted. Fifth infusion brought out the mellowness and previous notes that seemed to be of same magnitude. At this point I noticed that the tea is starting to get hard on my stomach/liver. Suprisingly, sixth infusion brought out some floral notes while vanquishing any remnants of dust, but with less prominent tobacco note.

This is where I called it a day and let the leaves rest on cool place untill the next day. I was later advised by ESGREEN that I shouldn’t have done it. So on day two I rinsed the leaves to awaken them and steep it for 25 seconds, and this being seventh infusion it showed some floral notes binding with hints of mineral and more prominent clay profile. Next infusion brought out more balanced appearance with somewhat nutty aftertaste (this stuff has pocketful of surprises, doesn’t it?). The following four infusion (for total of twelve) were less surprising but enjoyable. This is where I felt that I’m pretty much done
with it.

A leaf with magician’s surprise arsenal.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C
K S

What did ESGREEN say you did wrong? Did they give an explanation?

kOmpir

" Hi Alen, you did right for the steeping. Long time stored raw pu-erhs has no steeping differences with ripe pu-erh. But we do not recommend soak the tea leaves in cold water or let’s say: please don’t keep the infused tea leaves. The infused tea leaves are more like cooked foods. There will be subtle changes inside. It may be not good for health. The the flavor and taste will completely change too."

K S

I have heard others say they cold brewed the leaf overnight with success. I usually drain the leaf and spread it out so it can air dry and reuse the next day. Usually it works well, On rare occasion the leaf doesn’t take well to drying and reuse. I have never had mold issues from overnight storage which is where I thought they were going with their advice. What ever works for you and doesn’t give you botulism. lol.

kOmpir

It worked fine for me as well, but I keep my leaves in cool place overnight to inhibit bacteria/fungus growth that might be present.

Uniquity

I’ve kept the same leaves in my infuser for two days and used them. Not that you should, but I’ve yet to see them go bad overnight. One time the beau did leave some green tea in an infuser for several weeks though – that was yucky!

K S

I wouldn’t do this if the leaf looked even a little funky, but it has always looked fine. Not advising anyone else to do it.

ESGREEN

There is a famous TV show in China recommended a diet recipe with over night pu-erh. But I really could not agree with that. No medical proof for health affection. But the flavor could change obviously. In China we called it “Shu Wei” which means “over cooked flavor”. It’s something like fresh vegetables compared with cooked vegetables.

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