97

This Xingyang Golden Leaf, well, what more can be said about it at this point that has not already been said here below.

The flavor is exceptionally clean, earthy, mossy. Its’ complexity begins to stretch out into notes of molasses and pepper within three steepings. It delivers a mentholated sensation that expands from the hollows of your mouth into the sinus cavity where it sits quite contentedly. The broth coats the tongue, awakening it with a tingling sensation.

Within two steeps your body begins to slow, and by the third and fourth your feet and hands begin to tingle. I have done 8 steepings this afternoon, so you can assume how I am feeling at this point. I am planning a lengthier session for tomorrow morning.

I was actually considering a cold steep. Has anyone else done this with this pu’er, or any other? While in Beijing this past September I had just finished an incredible session with a sheng prepared by a tea master. I was about to leave for an appointment, and suddenly a small yixing pot was lifted from the side of the table and I was given a cold steeping that had been going for hours. In all honesty, I was scared that it was going to be beastly in flavor. It was however, quite the opposite. Despite being near to midnight black, the tea was exceptionally smooth, clean and sweet, and frankly a revelation. I had two porcelain cups full and stumbled out, tea drunk, into the night.

Charles Thomas Draper

Erich I am pretty well known here for my cold steppings. I have not cold-brewed any Pu’ers. These I will brew normally and if there is some left over I will just chill it. My recipe for cold brewing is generally done with greener Oolongs. I truly believe the natural essence of the tea is brought out.

Charles Thomas Draper

Pardon the spelling it is late here….

erichbenoit

:) and pardon me for appearing unobservant, as I should have clarified that as other pu’er (i was actually enjoying your post on the cold brew of white recently last night catching up after some time down due to a persistent low back issue). I have done white, greens, reds and oolongs in cold steepings, but had never considered a cold steep of pu’er before that one in Beijing. I was going to steep this one out more this morning and was planning on giving it an overnight sit, as I seem to remember that is done at the latter point of the session(s).

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

People who liked this

Comments

Charles Thomas Draper

Erich I am pretty well known here for my cold steppings. I have not cold-brewed any Pu’ers. These I will brew normally and if there is some left over I will just chill it. My recipe for cold brewing is generally done with greener Oolongs. I truly believe the natural essence of the tea is brought out.

Charles Thomas Draper

Pardon the spelling it is late here….

erichbenoit

:) and pardon me for appearing unobservant, as I should have clarified that as other pu’er (i was actually enjoying your post on the cold brew of white recently last night catching up after some time down due to a persistent low back issue). I have done white, greens, reds and oolongs in cold steepings, but had never considered a cold steep of pu’er before that one in Beijing. I was going to steep this one out more this morning and was planning on giving it an overnight sit, as I seem to remember that is done at the latter point of the session(s).

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Profile

Bio

I trained under a CIA graduate as a baker/pastry chef in the early 90s. I then delved into the world of chocolate head on, culminating with taking a foundation chocolatiering course in France at Valrhona. While chocolate remains a major part of my life, tea developed into my strongest passion following a transcendent experience with a wonderful Tie Guan Yin. I have a particular fondness for aged teas of all varieties which I blame on my recently discovered white beard.

I am at present, a publicist at Forced Exposure -a music distributor.

Location

Arlington, MA

Website

http://discipleofthetealeaf.w...

Following These People