Hundred Year Laocong Pu-erh

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by John Grebe
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec

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  • “This was one of the first puerh teas that I had in my early days of tea drinking. I remember thinking that it was really good but really expensive at the time so I slowly drank it as a special...” Read full tasting note
    100
    JohnGrebe 224 tasting notes

From Ten Ren

Pu-erh tea drinkers value Pu-erh tea which has been aged for a long time. The Hundred Year Laocong Pu-erh Tea has a different aspect of aged Pu-erh tea. Instead of the finished tea leaves being aged, Hundred Year Laocong Puerh uses tea leaves harvested from aged and ancient tea trees. The tea plant, Camellia Sinensis, are usually cultivated and pruned to the size of a bush. However in the wild, the Camellia Sinensis tea plant can grow into a tree and some of these trees can live for hundreds of years.

Hundred Year Laocong Puerh tea is produced from tea leaves harvest from these aged and ancient tea trees. Laocong means ancient tree in Chinese. The finished tea leaves and the taste of the tea is different from the typical Pu-erh. When brewed, Hundred Year Old Laocong Pu-Erh Tea produces a dark tan soup with a strong earthy aroma. The taste is moderately earthy that continues into a mildly astringent aftertaste.

The water used to steep this tea should be at the boiling point, 212°F (100°C). Use about 2 teaspoons (3 grams) of tea leaves for about every 5 ounces (150 milliliters) of water. A steeping time of about 3-5 minutes is recommended with more or less time depending on the desired concentration. Net tea weight 1.76 ounces (50 g) and shipping weight 0.4 lb.

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1 Tasting Note

100
224 tasting notes

This was one of the first puerh teas that I had in my early days of tea drinking. I remember thinking that it was really good but really expensive at the time so I slowly drank it as a special occasion tea while it lasted. Recently I decided to get it again to see what I think of it now which I think is likely at least five years if not longer since the last time I’ve had it. The brew is non earthy and has a warm sweet taste to it which I’d describe as neither malty nor mellow. I know it is a character of Laocong puerh which like Menghai and Mengku puerh the unique taste defies description. Overall a wonderful tea but one that you are parying a premium for the fancy packaging.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec

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