Yunnan Bao Hong Spring Early Green Tea

Tea type
Green Tea
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Edit tea info Last updated by teaddict
Average preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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  • “This is what I said about the tea when doing a comparative tasting in March: Used 1.8 grams of tea in small 40 mL gaiwan Infusions 160°F/71°C-170°F/77°C 30”, 30” (probably too long, with all the...” Read full tasting note
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    teaddict 311 tasting notes

From Yunnan Sourcing

“Bao Hong” tea is from Yi Liang county of Yunnan. It’s leaf is quite small and it carries a high level of aroma. The leaves are always picked when very small and fresh during a two hour window of time in the early morning of late March. The aroma is intense and fresh. It was first grown in the Tang Dynasty (A.D. 618-907) at the same time a Buddhist Monastery was built on Bao Hong Mountain. The original tea plant was brought by a visiting monk from Fujian. This tea has been growing on Bao Hong Mountain since that time (over 1200 years ago).

Yi Liang county has a very moderate climate with a mean daily temperature of 16.3 degrees celsius, and an average yearly rainfall of about 950 centimeters. The Bao Hong Mountain tea garden is an average of 1550-1630 meters above sea level, where it is often shrouded in mist diffusing the sunlight just enough to create a perfect light balance. Bao Hong mountain is remote area of Yunnan where the tea plants enjoy a natural un-adulterated environment.

The tea itself is full and plump but small. It has a high level of fragrance and the tea soup is thick and awash with the little hairs that grow on the tea leaves.

Comparable in many aspects to a Dragon Well, but unique in its own right.

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1 Tasting Note

61
311 tasting notes

This is what I said about the tea when doing a comparative tasting in March:

Used 1.8 grams of tea in small 40 mL gaiwan
Infusions 160°F/71°C-170°F/77°C
30”, 30” (probably too long, with all the bitterness coming out in the 2nd infusion), 30”
Dry Leaves: flat thin small leaves and fragments, some stems, scent of hay, grass
Liquor, 1st infusion: yellow liquor; thicker body; hay, warm, less camphor, but very similar to the Jade Pole (also a Yunnan green tea from Yunnan Sourcing)
Liquor, 2nd infusion: nutty, dark, vegetal, astringent
Liquor, 3rd infusion: sweet, vegetal, bit nutty, but much less astringent
Wet Leaves: more broken pieces, leaves are quite small, yellow-green,and also mostly buds and small leaves

Tonight used a lot of leaf, water about 170 degrees, filled the gaiwan with leaf and steeped enough infusions to fill the quart thermos with nutty warm lightly sweet tea. Mellow and tasty, but not as good a control of the sweet as I sometimes can get with my chinese green teas—under very difficult performance conditions, of course, with the ‘bulk’ brewing.

Preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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