Yunnan Early Spring Bi Luo Chun Green tea * Spring 2014

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Green Tea Leaves
Flavors
Nuts, Peas
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Medium
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by sherapop
Average preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 1 min, 45 sec 5 g 12 oz / 369 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

2 Images

1 Want it Want it

3 Own it Own it

4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “The "Spring Snail Shell" dried tea from Yunnan Sourcing is some of the most beautiful I've seen. The shape really is snail-shell-like, and the colors range from white to dark green with stunning...” Read full tasting note
    90
    Shera Pop 888 tasting notes
  • “This bi luo chun is tightly rolled with about 50% of the visible leaf being silver green downy buds and the other visible portions being a spruce grey green. Once exhausted and unrolled the...” Read full tasting note
    yyz 344 tasting notes
  • “it is truly Spring in a cup. pale green, sweet nutty and so refreshing. like sugar peas 165F 1tsp 8oz could be brewed many times. Steeped only for 1min. As cools doesnt get bitter. i'm not...” Read full tasting note
    93
    boychik 308 tasting notes

From Yunnan Sourcing

Spring comes early in Yunnan! A mild sunny winter, quickly gives way to spring which allows for this fresh and nutty green tea. It is composed entirely of buds and leaves picked in early March. If not over-steeped or scalded (use 85C-90C water) it can be infused up to 8 times!

Classic Yunnan Green tea with 1 leaf and 1 bud picked and rolled together!

March 2014 harvest!

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

4 Tasting Notes

90
888 tasting notes

The “Spring Snail Shell” dried tea from Yunnan Sourcing is some of the most beautiful I’ve seen. The shape really is snail-shell-like, and the colors range from white to dark green with stunning silken yellow shimmers interspersed. Each piece looks like a tiny sculpture!

With infusion, these tiny snail shells bloom into full leaf sets. This tea is picked as two leaves and a bud. The volume must have quadrupled by the second infusion, with the leaves now large and a striking yellowish green hue. Even if the tea weren’t so tasty, it would be worth infusing just to witness the metamorphosis!

But the tea is tasty, so I have two reasons. I just read the fascinating chapter on Bi Lo Chun in The Harney & Sons Guide to Tea, where I learned that this tea is quite rare, as it is produced only on a small island, Dongting on the Tai Hu (Tai Lake). It’s a very special tea in that it is harvested only once in early spring, before the Qing Ming festival.

One caveat offered by Michael Harney is that this tea goes stale easily. I guess that means that I’d better make this my first green of the day (GOD) more often!

To me the flavor is more subtle and less vegetal than Mao Feng or just about any other China green. The texture is smooth and silken. I have no idea how to describe the scent. Does it smell like roasted endive? What a great comparison (by Michael Harney), but perhaps not that helpful, since for many people it’s bound to be a clear case of obscurum per obscurius!

Preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 2 min, 30 sec 5 g 17 OZ / 502 ML
boychik

I like this one too. I didn’t know it goes stale easily. Better drink up!

sherapop

Exactly, boychik!

Terri HarpLady

I haven’t tried any of the green tea from YS

sherapop

Terri HarpLady: I really wanted to order some pu-erh, but I’m a gringo and became overwhelmed by the array of offerings!

apt

Someone on Reddit accidentally aged a Biluochun for about 7 years and it ended up becoming one of his favorites.

sherapop

How interesting, apt! Thanks for sharing that tidbit. It just goes to show: one person’s trash is another person’s treasure. It is funny how some teas are valued more the older they are, but many are considered good only when young… Same with foods like cheese. People only want mold on some cheeses. ;-)

Terri HarpLady

This also applied to home made sauerkraut & other cultured foods :)

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

344 tasting notes

This bi luo chun is tightly rolled with about 50% of the visible leaf being silver green downy buds and the other visible portions being a spruce grey green. Once exhausted and unrolled the leaves, the buds and the attached stem are visible and seem to be of good quality.

This is a nice tea with the brightness and sweetness of an early spring tea combined with the nuttiness and density you often get in this tea type.

I steeped 1 TSP of leaf in a 150 ml Gaiwan and using my regular progression of 45 s + 15… I made 6 steeps of this tea.

This tea like the Yunnan white bi luo chun I had ( also from boychik, thanks by the way!), had nice spicy gardenia like floral notes, which in this case were tempered by a lemony note. It also had deepening over time chestnut and plum notes, snap pea, spinach, alfalfa, cream and orange rind. It was slightly astringent while brewed in the low to mid 80’s but had a nice thick and creamy density.

Altogether a really nice tea and a good change from the lighter and very sweet greens I tend to drink most often!

boychik

Great review as usual;)

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

93
308 tasting notes

it is truly Spring in a cup. pale green, sweet nutty and so refreshing. like sugar peas
165F 1tsp 8oz could be brewed many times. Steeped only for 1min. As cools doesnt get bitter.
i’m not green tea person but I love it.

Flavors: Nuts, Peas

Preparation
165 °F / 73 °C 1 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML
ifjuly

sounds wonderful. i love bi luo chun, and to me it represents warm weather for sure. so many fond memories of drinking it all summer last year, yum.

Stephanie

Yum greeny

DeliriumsFrogs

That sounds soooo good.

SimpliciTEA

This is a good one. I will have to write a review soon. I found the first steep to be very flavorful (180F at ~1 min.) but the 2nd and third to be not so flavorful)

sherapop

I am ordering this on your recommendation! (You were right about Scott. ;-))

Login or sign up to leave a comment.