Plum Beauty 2016 Mengsong Ripe Puer

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Pu Erh Tea Leaves
Flavors
Berries, Bitter, Cacao, Chocolate, Creamy, Dark Bittersweet, Spicy, Sweet, Wet Wood, Dirt, Earth, Salt
Sold in
Bulk
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by TJ Elite
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 9 g 4 oz / 110 ml

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Gong Fu. So I drank this earlier last week on my day off, but I was feeling lazy and decided not to write about it on the same day. I slightly regret that choice now, because now I’m feeling a...” Read full tasting note
    88
  • “Wow, it’s been a while since I’ve reviewed a ripe pu’er. I haven’t really explored Bitterleaf’s shu pu’ers, so I went in not knowing what to expect. The sample I received was simply a single piece...” Read full tasting note
  • “One thing I liked about Plum Beauty Ripe was how smooth the texture was, and if it wasn’t for the earthy tasting notes, you could have convinced me I was drinking a hong. Another thing I liked...” Read full tasting note
    86
  • “1/10 ratio and 212F/100C Very nice material, you can see from the pic. 1 rinse. Didn’t smell funky to me. Moderately sweet smooth and earthy in the beginning. I went away and when came back...” Read full tasting note

From Bitterleaf Teas

Our 2016 Plum Beauty ripe puer is a special tea in our lineup. Using the same Mengsong old tree material as our 2017 Plum Beauty Silver, this tea is of much higher quality than most commonly found ripe puers, which is immediately noticeable from the first sip. It also adds an additional level of comparison with the rest of our Plum Beauty teas, allowing a direct comparison of old tree Mengsong material processed as raw and ripe puer.

This tea brews up thick and smooth, and features a dried plum sweetness and gentle wood scent. Having been taken off the pile in October 2016 and pressed in October of 2017, this is an exceptionally clean ripe that is entirely free of any “dui wei” or offensive flavours. As this tea is quite thick, we recommend using slightly less leaf than normal and/or ensuring short steeping times (fast in, fast out) for the first several infusions. However, if you like your shou puer nice and thick, just carry on as usual!

The garden for this tea is located in the northern region of Mengsong (Menghai county), just a few kilometers south of Naka, at an altitude between 1800-1900m. Mengsong is noted for its small leaf varietal tea trees.

We worked together on these teas with a friend (Mei) who has been leasing these gardens for the past 10 years and has a contract that extends well into the next decade. Her conscientious approach to maintaining the land and meticulous oversight of these teas’ production made them an easy choice for pressing.

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4 Tasting Notes

88
6744 tasting notes

Gong Fu.

So I drank this earlier last week on my day off, but I was feeling lazy and decided not to write about it on the same day. I slightly regret that choice now, because now I’m feeling a little fuzzy with recalling what it tasted like. I’m gonna do my best describing this, though…

So, all in all I got around fifteen infusions out of this – though the last ones were pretty lousy as I was drinking this during a conference call at work and the water in my kettle was cooling down a lot and not leeching out flavour from the leaves the same way it had been earlier in the session, and I just didn’t want to reboil it over the call since my kettle is SO LOUD when it’s boiling…

Up until we hit that point, I was having a jolly good time with this session though. This is a really clean and smooth tasting pu’erh even right off the bat. Like, I did a rinse but I got the impression that I probably wouldn’t even really need to. It’s also really woody tasting, which is a HUGE win for me. I actually picked this one up in the first place because I’d seen it described as incredibly woody tasting and that’s my favourite quality in a shou so I was kind of banking on it being an accurate descriptor. So pleased to see that it is. Apart from great woody character, I also thought this had some of that petrichor/slightly sweet wet earth taste that I also really enjoy in a shou. Combined with how clean tasting it is, it just really made me feel like I was out in a forest after a heavy rainfall – just soaking it all in. After infusion three or four some sweeter cocoa notes were introduced into the profile and just a little bit of a prune sort of undertone.

It was really pleasant, and basically just consisted of all my favourite shou sort of tasting notes! Very excited to revisit this one in the future, and just thrilled that I caked it.

TJ Elite

Nice. I like this one a lot. Excited to see how it ages.

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68 tasting notes

Wow, it’s been a while since I’ve reviewed a ripe pu’er. I haven’t really explored Bitterleaf’s shu pu’ers, so I went in not knowing what to expect. The sample I received was simply a single piece from the cake. To me the compression seemed rather high, reminding me of Hai Lang Hao’s ripe pu’er bricks, expect in bing form. I found it easier to just chip away some small bits until I was left with a single twelve gram chuck, so that’s what I did. The appearance is rather appealing, reminding me of teas like the Green Miracle for example, although the buds seem smaller and so forth. The dry leaf has a familiar shu pu’er manure scent, although this could have been acquired in my pumidor so don’t place too much weight on that.

I used a 160ml Jianshui clay teapot to brew the tea. Since the tea was so highly compressed and still fairly young as well, I opted to do two short five second rinses instead of one longer one to try to soften up the tea a little. This was followed by a ten minute rest before proceeding to steep the tea. The rinsed leaves didn’t have a very strong scent. The smell was very interesting and unique though, very perfumy. Later on into the session I could pick up the scent of wet wood that had begun to decompose coming from the teapot. I did a total of twelve steeps, the timing for these being 10s, 10s, 13s, 15s, 20s, 30s, 45s, 75s, 2 min., 3 min., 5 min. and 10 min.

At this point I should mention I’ve been dealing with the flu for the past week, but I’d say I’m more than 90% recovered when it comes to appreciating tea. As another side note, I drank this tea both from a regular teacup as well as an unglazed Jianshui clay teacup dedicated to shu pu’er. Most of my drinking was done from the clay cup, but I had the regular cup there for reference just in case. With other types of tea I find it less straightforward, but in regard to shu pu’er I find that the clay almost exclusively improves the tea. The flavors are much more forward, the body is better and you lose hardly any of the nuance of the tea. If you are looking for the simplest and most cost-efficient way to improve your every ripe pu’er session, my tip would be to buy a simple cup from a vendor you trust and see if it makes a difference for you.

Anyway, getting back to the tea, the first infusion brewed rather cloudy, which is to be expect from a tea this young. The liquor itself had a sort of nasty smell to it, though, which was kind of new to me. That was limited to just this steep, however. As expected from a first infusion and a chunk that had still yet to properly come apart, although there was already flavor, the tea was still fairly light. The tea was kinda oily, but not necessarily in the same way as a raw pu’er. I still don’t know what people are talking about exactly when they speak of fermentation taste in the early steeps of young shu pu’er, but I did pick up some of the taste I’ve encountered in some other young ripes. For me it’s this sort of very mineraly taste that I could see some people describing as feeling slightly “off” or perhaps even slightly unpleasant, although I’ve never really had problem with it myself. Overall the tea was slightly sweet with a spicy finish. It left a sense of freshness in your mouth and helped open up my clogged airways featuring some nice mouth cooling as well.

The second infusion produced a much darker color now that the leaves had begun to open up and separate from one another. The liquor was still very cloudy, like dirty, extremely muddy water. The flavor was also much stronger. I could taste cacao, or you could also call it unsweetened hot chocolate. Overall you could call the tea bittersweet. The brew that followed produced an almost black liquor, but you could also tell that there was much more clarity now. The tea was thick, coating and lubricating, producing thick saliva in your mouth. It was even bolder than before, with darker tones to it. I could taste chocolate, perhaps even hints of vanilla. There was also a pleasant bitterness running through the tea that I enjoyed. Overall this infusion was really nice.

Steep four brewed as black, if not darker than the previous one. A sort of syrupy sweetness was beginning to emerge in the tea. Bittersweet would describe the tea quite well. The fifth steep had a taste of wet wood. There was also a potent, hidden sweetness within the tea. The steep was quite strong with lasting flavors. I found this infusion in particular very warming. I ended up having to take off my sweater as I suddenly began to feel extremely hot.

The color didn’t let up in the sixth and seventh steeping. The tea continued to brew strong and bittersweet, with both the bitterness and sweetness strengthening. Steep seven also had an interesting perfumy quality to it. The eighth infusion produced a gorgeous dark ruby red color with perfect clarity to it. It was one of the most gorgeous colors I’ve witnessed while brewing tea. The tea on the other hand wasn’t as potent as before. The texture was thinner and the flavors much simpler than before. The taste was slightly creamy, with some emerging minerality. Super clean taste overall. The tea left your palate relatively clean, although there was a lingering aftertaste as well.

The ninth steeping still continued to give a really dark color, although the liquor itself looked much “thinner” now, like colored water rather than tea. The taste was really creamy now. The sweetness had changed. It was very interesting. It had depth to it which is something I have not really experienced from sweetness before. Thanks to the extended steeping time there was decent body as well. The color did continued to fade in the tenth steep, though the tea was still brewing about as dark as some ripe pu’ers get. The flavors were definitely tapering off fast though. I could taste some of those red berries that I often get in Menghai area ripes just as they are about to steep out.

Steeps eleven and twelve were both longer ones and produced mainly a basic sweetness with some body as well. The strength and color were still decent and the tea could have probably gone for a couple more extra long steeps, but I decided to call it there. Toward the end of the session I could feel some mild qi in my body. It was nothing major, mainly a dull, pulsating sensation in my body. I did experience another wave of heat as well.

Looking at the steeped leaves at the end of the session, they look totally different from any ripe pu’er I’ve seen before. The leaves are large, springy and lively like raw pu’er, not dull, disintegrated and unrecognizable like most shu pu’ers. I’d say just from the appearance that these leaves look like higher quality material than a lot of sheng pu’ers out there.

So what did I think of this tea? I thought the material is excellent. This tea brews strong and it brews long. It even has qi, which speaks to the origin of the material. Although I enjoyed the flavors, the one caveat I have with this tea is that I didn’t find it to be very dynamic. The tea is very young, however, so this could change with time. I don’t have that much experience with ripe pu’er so I can’t really speak to how much change you can expect, but having revisited Yunnan Sourcing’s Green Miracle recently, I felt it had changed in terms of flavor over the past twelve months. I know the level of fermentation plays a big role here.

Having been made from the same material as their silver grade Plum Beauty raw pu’er, this tea is priced similarly, which places it outside what most people are willing to pay for ripe pu’er or raw pu’er even in some cases. I’ve tasted many shu pu’ers that are supposedly from higher quality material than your typical ripes, but this tea easily blew all those teas out of the water in terms of raw quality of the material. While this was not my favorite ripe pu’er based on a single session, I found it an interesting and rewarding tea to session nonetheless and I will be purchasing a cake of it in the very near future. I expect this to be a tea to benefit a lot from aging and will give it at least a year before even sessioning it again.

Flavors: Berries, Bitter, Cacao, Chocolate, Creamy, Dark Bittersweet, Spicy, Sweet, Wet Wood

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 12 g 5 OZ / 160 ML

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88 tasting notes

One thing I liked about Plum Beauty Ripe was how smooth the texture was, and if it wasn’t for the earthy tasting notes, you could have convinced me I was drinking a hong. Another thing I liked about this tea was its energy, because despite this teas humidness, it made me feel tea drunk. However, it was still really humid and could benefit from resting in the pumidor for a bit longer.

You can read my full review here…

https://www.theoolongdrunk.com/single-post/2018/01/24/Plum-Beauty-Ripe-by-Bitter-Leaf-Teas

Flavors: Dirt, Earth, Salt

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493 tasting notes

1/10 ratio and 212F/100C
Very nice material, you can see from the pic.
1 rinse. Didn’t smell funky to me. Moderately sweet smooth and earthy in the beginning.
I went away and when came back continued the session. I was glad it was on a break cuz the chunk opened up completely.
This was kinda refined shou (if shou can be refined) smooth and somewhat medicinal bitter taste which is not a negative thing , it only brings more complexity in my opinion.
Very interesting shou, thank you bitterleafteas for a great session!

https://instagram.com/p/BeYtqTnjFLz/

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 2 OZ / 60 ML

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