Ceylon-Lovers Leap Estate

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Black Tea Leaves
Flavors
Almond, Autumn Leaf Pile, Cream, Honey, Malt, Nutmeg, Straw, Toast, White Grapes, Wood
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec 8 oz / 236 ml

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  • “I’m starting to catch up on my reviews again. I finished the last of this tea yesterday. All I can say is that I have finally found a Ceylonese black tea that I really enjoy. I prepared this tea...” Read full tasting note
    91

From Simpson & Vail

Sri Lanka, formerly known as Ceylon, has been providing excellent teas since the mid 1800’s and is currently one of the largest tea producing countries in the world. Prior to the introduction of tea plants to Sri Lanka, this country was primarily known for its crops of cinnamon and coffee. Due to economic changes, which affected the cinnamon crop, and a fungal disease, which devastated the coffee plants, Ceylon began experimenting with tea plants in 1839. It wasn’t until 1867, when James Taylor, a British planter, began a tea plantation in Kandy, that tea was established as a viable industry. His venture was soon followed by other tea gardens in and around the area.

Sri Lanka has 6 growing regions: Kandy, Uda Pussellawa, Uva, Ruhuna, Dimbula and Nuwara Eliya. The central highlands of Sri Lanka offer humidity, cooler temperatures and consistent rainfall, all of which provide a favorable environment for high quality teas.

Ceylon teas are best paired with foods such as breakfast meals (breads, eggs, smoked fish, bacon, etc.), light savory foods, meats, eggs, cream cheese, pastries and fruit, to name a few.

Located in the western area of Sri Lanka, in the mountainous region of Nuwara Eliya, the Lover’s Leap Estate looks down onto the clouds. Local lore says that there is a cliff on the estate where lovers would leap off if they were forbidden to marry, hence the name Lover’s Leap.

The large, black twisted leaves from this garden brew to a light amber cup with a forest aroma and a smooth and mellow taste.

Brew tea at 212º – steep for 3 minutes.

About Simpson & Vail View company

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1 Tasting Note

91
474 tasting notes

I’m starting to catch up on my reviews again. I finished the last of this tea yesterday. All I can say is that I have finally found a Ceylonese black tea that I really enjoy.

I prepared this tea using the simple one step Western infusion that I always seem to use for non-Chinese black teas. As usual, I did not attempt multiple infusions. I steeped 1 teaspoon of this tea in 8 ounces of 212 F water for 3 minutes.

In the cup, the liquor was lighter than most Ceylon teas I have tried. Rather than being a dark amber, this one was a brilliant gold. The color was surprising to me because it was very reminiscent of Darjeeling. On the nose, I picked up delicate aromas of wood, toast, straw, toasted almond, malt, cream, honey, spice, and dried leaves. In the mouth, I detected delicate impressions of wood, straw, cream, malt, toast, honey, toasted almonds, dried leaves, and nutmeg, as well as a subtle note of white grape that was most noticeable on the finish.

I recall reading a review of another Lovers Leap Estate black tea by a fellow Steepsterite (yes, I’m talking about you Teatotaler) that referred to it as a poor man’s Darjeeling. I can totally see where this individual was coming from with that assertion. Compared to many other Ceylonese black teas that I have tried in recent months, this tea’s lighter flavor profile with its notes of straw, honey, and grapes is really reminiscent of Darjeeling. The comparison is not exact, however, as this tea does not entirely match the aroma and flavor profiles of most typical Darjeelings, but there are more than enough similarities present between the two to put one in mind of the other. For me, the only real tip off that this was indeed a Ceylonese tea was that ever present leafy aroma and flavor I always seem to associate with Ceylon black teas. Okay, enough rambling. This is a very good black tea. I could see this going over well with fans of Ceylonese and Indian black teas alike. Even if you-like me-are not a huge fan of Ceylon teas, you may want to give this one a try. You may very well find it just different enough to really make an impression.

Flavors: Almond, Autumn Leaf Pile, Cream, Honey, Malt, Nutmeg, Straw, Toast, White Grapes, Wood

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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