China Fujian Tong Mu Wild Lapsang Souchong Black Tea

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Lapsang Souchong
Flavors
Almond, Cinnamon, Cream, Lemon, Lychee, Malt, Marshmallow, Mineral, Mushrooms, Orange, Orchid, Peach, Pepper, Rose, Soy sauce, Spicy, Sweet Potatoes, Vegetables, Wood, Baked Bread, Brown Sugar, Butter, Chocolate, Honey, Peanut, Pine, Straw, Violet
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Daylon R Thomas
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 6 g 4 oz / 109 ml

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I’ve been drinking this April 2017 harvest western style in the mornings over the course of this week. Very clean, cooked vegetable savory and lemony and packed a heck of a caffeine punch. I...” Read full tasting note
    96
  • “This was my first sipdown of the month as I finished a mini-sample of this tea on the very first day of the month. I received the sample as a freebie with a more recent What-Cha order. As those of...” Read full tasting note
    93
  • “What-Cha restocked this. I had two more cups worth left. I should have realized that Hawkband wanted this because I would have given her more. Anyway, I had two servings left and I am glad I saved...” Read full tasting note
    95

From What-Cha

A smooth tea with a sweet lingering citrus taste with notes of orange and lemon.

This is the non-smoky Lapsang Souchong.

Tasting Notes:
- Smooth texture
- Sweet lingering citrus taste
- Notes of orange and lemon

Harvest: Spring, May 10th 2016

Origin: Tong Mu Guan, Wuyishan, Fujian, China
Elevation: 1,340m
Sourced: Direct from the farmer

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 95°C/203°F
- Use 1-2 teaspoons per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 2-3 minutes

Packaging: Resealable ziplock bag

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

4 Tasting Notes

96
479 tasting notes

I’ve been drinking this April 2017 harvest western style in the mornings over the course of this week. Very clean, cooked vegetable savory and lemony and packed a heck of a caffeine punch. I usually used 2 tsp for one steep of a minute or two at 205F, then a second steep for as long as it took me to get ready. Not once did I experience any bitterness or astringency preparing the tea this way.

Today, I finally got around to doing a gongfu session and regret not doing so sooner. The dry leaf, now with 2 years of age, has settled into a soy-sauced and lemony vegetable stir-fry with some pepperiness, sweet potato and marshmallow sweetness, rose and spicy wood (agar). In addition to those aromas, warming the leaf brought out some sautéed mushroom. The rinse, which I drank, was piercing and strong and I was able to discern something like ginkgo nuts. I don’t know how to describe that scent.

The taste was incredibly complex, showcasing the various aromas of the leaf with hints of almond, malt and cinnamon. The body was medium, satisfying, full in the throat. Clean minerality. Aftertastes of peach, peach pit, lemon, lychee and cream. Bottom of the cup aroma of toasted marshmallow? Orange-lemon aroma. The tea forcefully maintained these characteristics for 6 steeps, when most black teas would have lost much, if not all, of their steam. With the seventh steep, some orchid came out in the mouth and the tea transitioned into a stronger lemon taste. This tea just did not want to stop. At the end, I was pushing 10+ minute brews and still sipping on something bright with a light tannic bite. I’m amazed that a black tea could produce more than 15 steeps (the only other I’ve had with comparable longevity was the Jin Guazi offered by Old Ways Tea, another Wuyi black).

I wouldn’t say I’ve been wasting the tea with western style brewing, but the strength of the leaf and its flavor complexity blew me away when prepared gongfu. I recall the price being rather high, maybe somewhere less than $0.50/g, but in my opinion, this tea was well worth it and I would gladly buy more if it were restocked.

Flavors: Almond, Cinnamon, Cream, Lemon, Lychee, Malt, Marshmallow, Mineral, Mushrooms, Orange, Orchid, Peach, Pepper, Rose, Soy sauce, Spicy, Sweet Potatoes, Vegetables, Wood

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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93
835 tasting notes

This was my first sipdown of the month as I finished a mini-sample of this tea on the very first day of the month. I received the sample as a freebie with a more recent What-Cha order. As those of you who read my reviews are well aware, I am a huge, huge fan of Wuyi black teas. If I have one complaint about this specific style of tea (lapsang souchong/Zheng Shan Xiao Zhong), however, it is that teas of this type can often get a bit astringent. I did not have that complaint with this particular tea.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 203 F water for 5 seconds. This infusion was chased by 15 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 7 seconds, 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, and 5 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves emitted aromas of honey, cinnamon, roasted almond, mandarin orange, and peach. After the rinse, I found hints of baked bread, roasted peanut, and straw on the nose. The first infusion introduced floral scents reminiscent of rose and violet. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented notes of mandarin orange, baked bread, honey, roasted almond, and roasted peanut that were underscored by hints of straw. The subsequent infusions saw aromas of cream, lemon, malt, chocolate, brown sugar, and sweet potato emerge. Impressions of rose and violet appeared in the mouth along with subtle hints of cinnamon and peach. New notes of minerals, chocolate, brown sugar, cream, butter, malt, sweet potato, pine, and lemon also emerged. The final few infusions offered lingering mineral, malt, cream, and roasted almond notes that were balanced by hints of lemon, mandarin orange, sweet potato, and brown sugar.

This was an excellent Wuyi black tea, one that should satisfy even the most demanding fans of such teas. As mentioned earlier, I especially appreciated the fact that this tea never turned astringent. If you are looking for a quality unsmoked Wuyi black tea, be sure to check out this one.

Flavors: Almond, Baked Bread, Brown Sugar, Butter, Chocolate, Cinnamon, Cream, Honey, Lemon, Malt, Mineral, Orange, Peach, Peanut, Pine, Rose, Straw, Sweet Potatoes, Violet

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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95
1124 tasting notes

What-Cha restocked this. I had two more cups worth left. I should have realized that Hawkband wanted this because I would have given her more. Anyway, I had two servings left and I am glad I saved the sample because it is one of my favorite black teas thus far. Of course that is perking me to want to get another sample to savor, but there are like eight samples I want to do of What-Cha and three of them are in the same price range as this one. I’ll figure something out.

For specifics, I gong fu’d venturing 20, 30, 35, 50, 75, 2 minutes for 185 F in a 150 ml gaiwan. The profile was fairly consistent starting off at a vanilla lemon buttery thing of a black tea and the lemon continued with more malt in the later steeps as the citric sweetness faded to a present reminder. No bitterness or astringency-just smooth in every way like most of the teas Alistair recommends. And yes, I’m raising the rating and giving it a high one because I like it so much….never mind I did not Tumbler test it or Western test it, though it probably can handle it. However, it’s a special occasion tea that deserves the respect of careful steeping of gong fu. Tea made with skill deserves to be served with it.

CrowKettle

Oh! I’ve never seen a non-smoky Lapsang Souchong. On to the list it goes!

Daylon R Thomas

Non smoky ones tend to be on the “sweeter” side.

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