Taiwan Amber GABA Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Burnt Sugar, Caramel, Cinnamon, Pear, Spices, Fruity, Ginger, Lemon, Sour, Sweet, Vanilla, White Grapes
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 1 min, 45 sec 5 g 7 oz / 200 ml

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6 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Another great tea from What-Cha. It’s lighter in taste than I expected but I’m pleasantly surprised. Some roasted oolongs I find quite overwhelming and with this one I can have a longer session...” Read full tasting note
    90
  • “I figured I’d finally get some of my own tasting notes out for this tea, one of my favorites for its profile and ease of brewing. This harvest is from sometime in 2017 and has had over a year for...” Read full tasting note
    94
  • “This tea is not quite what I was expecting it to be. It is much less robust for once. The taste is actually very bright. Secondly, the body is fairly light for a Taiwanese oolong. And finally, the...” Read full tasting note
    75
  • “Why didn’t I get this when it was on sale, because this is one of the most versatile teas that I’ve had to date. I could drink it western or grandpa with just a sprinkle of leaves, and the notes of...” Read full tasting note
    100

From What-Cha

A most splendid oolong; smooth and sweet tasting with a lightly roasted pear finish coupled with vanilla hints.

The Amber GABA oolong is the same as our Taiwan GABA oolong with an added medium roast to bring out the sweetness in the tea.

Tasting Notes:
- Smooth texture
- Sweet taste
- Lightly roasted pear and vanilla notes

Harvest: Spring, May 2017
Roasted: November 2017

Organic: Non-certified organic farming

Origin: Ming Jian, Nantou County, Taiwan
Altitude: 350m
Sourced: Specialist Taiwanese wholesaler

Cultivar: Si Ji Chun (Four Seaons)
Oxidisation: 35-40%
Roast: Medium (Level 6)

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 95°C/203°F
- Use 1-2 teaspoons per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 3-4 minutes

Packaging: Non-resealable vacuum-sealed bag packaged in Taiwan

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

6 Tasting Notes

90
64 tasting notes

Another great tea from What-Cha. It’s lighter in taste than I expected but I’m pleasantly surprised. Some roasted oolongs I find quite overwhelming and with this one I can have a longer session without my taste buds getting fatigued.
I went western for this session. I always seem to underbrew when I go western style, I’m too impatient, I know.
The first note I got was lovely dark caramel, just on the verge of burnt sugar. The caramel flavor reminds me of my mother’s Greek semolina halva. Then some roasted pear and quince jam and some cinnamon spiciness. All these match pretty well with the festive season. The finish is pretty short but that just beckons you to have another sip.

Flavors: Burnt Sugar, Caramel, Cinnamon, Pear, Spices

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 30 sec 5 g 12 OZ / 350 ML
derk

Beckoning is a good way to describe the combination of sweet and mellow flavors and lightness of this tea. I enjoy that I can drink it quickly without much attention being paid. It became my go-to tea for night classes.

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94
298 tasting notes

I figured I’d finally get some of my own tasting notes out for this tea, one of my favorites for its profile and ease of brewing. This harvest is from sometime in 2017 and has had over a year for the roast to calm down (it wasn’t too strong to begin with) and allow other aromas and flavors to develop. Tonight, I choose you, gongfu. I haven’t drank this tea gongfu in a long time, instead brewing it in my 20oz thermos all of last semester to fuel me through night classes.

5g, 100mL, 205F, rinse, lost count of steeps but made it through 2L of water tonight.

Dry leaf smells tart, fruity, sweet and toasty with notes of roasted pear, baked apple and quince, cinnamon, nutmeg and vanilla. Warmed, it smells like just like cinnamon raisin toast. Rinsing brings out rye, caramel, cardboard, black cherry and a hint of burnt sugar.

This tea starts out strong and fades very slowly. With the first steep, the liquor is a sparkling and intense dark auburn-amber and maintains this color throughout the session. It has a light, sweet aroma with notes of baking spices and toast. In the mouth, I pick up on roasted pear, golden raisin, baked sweet apple, rock sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla and a light mineral presence. The tea is very clean in the mouth, light-bodied and smooth and lacks much of an aftertaste, making it very easy to drink without having to focus. The tea peaks in flavor around with the third steep, typical for a balled Taiwanese oolong, and fades slowly from there. Toward the end, the fruit and spice notes become indistinguishable, providing a background to butter and wood/slight tannins, with some sweet lemon becoming noticeable.

Admittedly, the tea hasn’t changed much since I first tried it, but I still love it. It’s an easy-going, unpretentious, straight-forward brew with comforting aromas and flavors that always leave me in an excellent mood.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
Kawaii433

I will have to try this one too. Good review. :D I liked their Taiwan GABA very much which is (if I remember correctly) not roasted. Lately, I’ve been favoring roasted oolongs more.

derk

Well you’re in luck.

Kawaii433

Yeah, when I just went to their site, I was glad it’s available.

derk

Lol, I can send you some.

derk

But good to know it’s in stock because I’m getting low.

Kawaii433

Thank you for offering, you keep it since you’re low. I’m going to get more their Vietnam GABA oolong anyway soon. I got a sample of that and really liked it.

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75
215 tasting notes

This tea is not quite what I was expecting it to be. It is much less robust for once. The taste is actually very bright. Secondly, the body is fairly light for a Taiwanese oolong. And finally, the aftertaste is much shorter than I would have liked and expected. Unless you really adore roasted pear (which is the dominant note I get), I cannot recommend it. However, given that other people seem to be enjoying it a lot, you might just want to try for yourself.

The smell is my favourite aspect of the tea. It is very fruity and sweet, with notes of vanilla, pear, Bailey’s and white grape skin, ginger and cinnamon. I get some ginger in the taste too, which also has lemon sourness and some roasted pear sweetness.

Flavors: Cinnamon, Fruity, Ginger, Lemon, Pear, Sour, Sweet, Vanilla, White Grapes

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 2 min, 0 sec 6 g 5 OZ / 150 ML
derk

Good to see a differing opinion. If you don’t want to finish it, I’ll take it off your hands!

Togo

Yeah, I can definitely send some over :)

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100
1049 tasting notes

Why didn’t I get this when it was on sale, because this is one of the most versatile teas that I’ve had to date. I could drink it western or grandpa with just a sprinkle of leaves, and the notes of pear, vanilla, and rock sugar blended with minerals in a smooth texture. I got the same thing with lighter splashes gong fu, but with more leaves, and occasionally longer steeps, it can become sticky sweet, malty, and roasted with the vanilla in the background. The same logic applies western with more leaves. Of course, I could rebrew it twelve times gong fu….with about 6-7 grams of leaves in 6 oz.

That pretty much described why I really enjoyed the tea, but it was able to be sweeter than my high mountain oolongs, and smoother WITHOUT vegetal notes. As for the roast notes, those could be avoided with lighter steeps if I wanted to.

This was one of the few roasted oolongs that is sweeter because of its roast for my palette, and this is something that I highly recommend to anyone who likes roasted pear or wants something unique because I’ve had few teas with the same notes that this one has.

LuckyMe

This sounds intriguing. Fruity roasted teas are the kind i seek out. Will have to check this out

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