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83

Bagged Bonanza Tea #3 for today!
Special Thanks to Amanda for this one!

My Norwegian surely needs to be improved. I have looked into Rosetta Stone but as of last year they didn’t offer Norwegian. I really want to learn more. The only bit I know is from my relatives from their parents and a few online buddies. I know that Nordqvist Tea is out of Finland and some of the Finnish Words are close to Norwegian Words…so I could read the words “Valkoinen Greippi Aloe” or "Vitt Grapefrukt Aloe: Vitt te med naturligt aromer fran aloe vera och grapefrukt which I guess translates to "White Tea Grapefruit Aloe: White Tea, Aloe Vera and Grapefruit Flavouring. INTERESTING.

Anyhow…

This certainly SMELLS more like Aloe than Grapefruit. It TASTES like a nice and mellow combo of all three – White Tea, Aloe, Grapefruit. With these quiet hints of flavors combined it gives it a more herbally taste or maybe even floral even.

I appreciate the different ingredients and flavor combo’s here…it’s different and you know I like that. This is a nice yet subtly flavored white tea in a bag…a rare find…but I am enjoying it quite a bit!

Bonnie

This is one of the most different sounding tea’s I’ve read about in a looonggg time. Happy new last name!

Angrboda

Actually, your quote there is Swedish. Swedish is taught in schools in Finland. It’s the second official language there, although not the primary. Norwegian (and Swedish and Danish) are North Germanic languages, while Finnish is a Uralic language so they don’t share a root at all.

Norwegian, Swedish and Danish, however, are very closely related. About a third of Danish words are the same in Swedish and Norwegian looks a lot like Danish but with spelling errors. :) As a Danish person, I’m capable of reading either, although I’ve never learned them formally. Icelandic and Faeroese are similarly close to each other, I believe, and they are very close to the way the Scandinavian languages were spoken a 1000 years ago. An Icelandic person can read and understand the Eddas as they were written back then, although with some effort. :)

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Bonnie

This is one of the most different sounding tea’s I’ve read about in a looonggg time. Happy new last name!

Angrboda

Actually, your quote there is Swedish. Swedish is taught in schools in Finland. It’s the second official language there, although not the primary. Norwegian (and Swedish and Danish) are North Germanic languages, while Finnish is a Uralic language so they don’t share a root at all.

Norwegian, Swedish and Danish, however, are very closely related. About a third of Danish words are the same in Swedish and Norwegian looks a lot like Danish but with spelling errors. :) As a Danish person, I’m capable of reading either, although I’ve never learned them formally. Icelandic and Faeroese are similarly close to each other, I believe, and they are very close to the way the Scandinavian languages were spoken a 1000 years ago. An Icelandic person can read and understand the Eddas as they were written back then, although with some effort. :)

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