Da Fo Long Jing (Big Buddha Dragon Well)

Tea type
Green Tea
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Edit tea info Last updated by Michael Hall
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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “*Thank you to cha dao (Now known as Alex_Allen) for this gift of tea!* I met Alex at the Rocky Mt. Tea Festival on Saturday! He's a very handsome and charming fellow! (I know he'd hate me...” Read full tasting note
    94
    bonniejohnstone 673 tasting notes
  • “This is by far my favorite green tea, other than Seven Cups' Shi Feng Long Jing, which is a bit out of my price range to have on a daily basis. Da Fo Long Jing has evenly shaped dry tea leaves,...” Read full tasting note
    98
    chadao 49 tasting notes

From Seven Cups

Long Jing is the most famous green tea in China. While Long Jing originated around Hangzhou City, it is now produced in many provinces resulting in a wide range of quality and flavor. There are thousands of Long Jing teas on the market but we have selected Da Fo Long Jing from Xin Chang County in Eastern Zhejiang because of the climate, skilled tea producers and history. Xin Chang County is one of the cradles of Chinese Buddhism with over 1,000 years of green tea production history. This certified organic tea is harvested before Qing Ming season with a picking of one plump bud with one or two leaves. The green, slightly yellow leaves are flat and smooth, straight and even which yields a bright green brew. Enjoy the long lasting floral aroma and mellow taste.

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4 Tasting Notes

94
673 tasting notes

Thank you to cha dao (Now known as Alex_Allen) for this gift of tea!

I met Alex at the Rocky Mt. Tea Festival on Saturday!
He’s a very handsome and charming fellow!
(I know he’d hate me saying that but he can get back at me now that he knows how talkative and annoying I am in person!).

Alex walked right on up to me at the end of my Cooking with Tea class (which had 5 courses and was yum-o) and said “Are you Bonnie?” And he handed me this tea gift. (Here you’re supposed to say “Awe, wasn’t that nice.”)
Well, I had a tea gift for him too…so we were being true to our Steepster selves and didn’t shame all of you our online friends.

We took an Oolong class together. I’ll talk about that when I do an Oolong tea review.

So, this was quite a big gift! Alex has no idea that before leaving Boulder, I stopped at Peppercorn (kitchen goods) and bought two 6oz tumblers just to prepare this tea (wanted it to be special).

Tea Time
The dry leaves were very pretty as though someone had pressed prescious blades of tea in the pages of an enormous book between waxed paper.
Vibrant greens in varigated shades, most unbroken, two leaves and often a pale bud.
When I stuck my nose into the bag there was a salty buttered spinach smell. Made me hungry.

The first 2 minute steep was so pretty. The green leaves glistening and swirling in my glass. Pale yellow green color and slightly sweet bean scented.
If you could catch the color and drink it…this would be what I tasted. The lightest bean and a vaporous sweetness.
No astringency or dryness at all.

For the second steep the leaves became larger and turned green with yellow.
I played lazily with the leaves, swirling them around, up and down until I was ready to strain them into the second tumbler.
I could have gone longer I’m sure… because this tea doesn’t become astringent.

At the sipping, I was pleased at the sweetness. There was a floral scent that was not present before. At first I thought of vanilla and jasmine but then changed my mind and thought of more of honeysuckle. (You have to consider these things for awhile)
Even though the tea was juicy and sweeter than before, there was a dryness under the tongue yet still no bitterness or astringenty on the finish.
The light sweet bean flavor was the only vegital taste. The mouthfeel not thin but also not buttery.
I wanted to see what would happen when the tea cooled.

After a few minutes, while the tea was still warm, I took a sip and discovered that the tea had become very silky. I thought there might be a transition to buttery as I’ve experienced before but this was very smooth, not thick at all and delightfully silky!

I can see why Alex loves this tea! It’s very forgiving if you mess up the steep time. Silky smooth when cooled and not astringent. Lightly fragrant and sweet.

Thank you Alex…it was a pleasure to meet you!

Spoonvonstup

How nice! Sounds like a lovely tea gift, and a fun meeting of the Steepster-ites.

Bonnie

Poor Chadao kept trying to offer me the gaiwan to serve everyone at our table and I kept refusing because I’m a gaiwan Klutzy person! By the end of 15 or 16 tastings I was a bit tea buzzed. A good way to meet people and make an impression! Duh!

Missy

That’s awesome that you had a tea meet up! :D

chadao

Hi Bonnie, just read this post. I’m so glad you enjoyed it so much! I especially liked how you swirled the leaves during the second steep. In Chinese tea culture, using the gaiwan lid to let the leaves “dance” for you is supposed to allow them to be more “free” and release a better flavor. Like we talked about at the tea festival, it’s all about building a relationship with the tea. If you have more of this tea, you should try more steepings next time. I can usually get four or five, increasing the time by a minute starting with the third steep.

Bonnie

Oh my yes! My only relationships are with tea and invisible but real people on Steepster (except a trip to the tea shop or outing with a family member). In my imagination you are all handsome and lovely.

Kashyap

“beauty is that which is unrepeatable” so in truth, your imagination is correct ;)

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98
49 tasting notes

This is by far my favorite green tea, other than Seven Cups’ Shi Feng Long Jing, which is a bit out of my price range to have on a daily basis. Da Fo Long Jing has evenly shaped dry tea leaves, indicating the masterful processing that it went through. The wet leaves reveal very few broken leaves with a picking standard of one bud to two young tender leaves. I have let the first steeping sit for as long as ten minutes, and it did not even get bitter! I could drink this tea straight out of the glass with the leaves steeping right in there and not have a problem. The flavor is intensely nutty and sweet, and the leaves yield at least five good steepings. This tea is truly the work of a master

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