Hide

Welcome to Steepster, an online tea community.

Write a tea journal, see what others are drinking and get recommendations from people you trust. or Learn More

Gyokuro Green Tea Uji

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Auggy
Average preparation
145 °F / 62 °C 1 min, 0 sec

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

2 Want it Want it

4 Own it Own it

8 Tasting Notes View all

  • “The husband caught a whiff of this while we were in the bulk teas section of the grocery store so I picked up a little bit to sample. This stuff is selling for $199.99 a pound! Goodness. I hope...” Read full tasting note
    97
    aug3zimm 911 tasting notes
  • “Let's just get this out of the way: Auggy is a goddess. No, seriously. Because I think I've finally gotten what all the hullabaloo has been about Japanese greens. I'm perpetually amazed at how...” Read full tasting note
    93
    teaplz 186 tasting notes
  • “Auggy was kind enough to send me a little of this. This is the first gyokuro I've made myself and I wanted to do it up right so I got a kyusu. The tea arrived here before the kyusu did, so there...” Read full tasting note
    88
    takgoti 260 tasting notes
  • “So I bought some gyokuro from englishteastore.com for an almost too good to be true price. So I was skeptical about its quality considering that most places charge 3 times the amount. So far I'm...” Read full tasting note
    84
    SirSteepsAlot 4 tasting notes

From Teance

Gyokuro Premium Grade
Mid Caffeine Green Tea
Uji, Japan
Steepings: 4 times

Shade growing green teas like Gyokuro means the direct rays of the sun is protected against, resulting in the chlorophyll and theanins being produced in larger quantities by the leaves. This shading process also reduces the astringency taste of the tea. As the tea matures through the months of May through September, it becomes rich, buttery, and sweet. The taste of this tea has a pronounced sense of Umami, a term in Japanese meaning rich meal like taste.

Grown by Shimooka san, who has won more awards in Japan for his Gyokuro than any other, and is the most recent recipient of the utmost prestigious award the Emperor’s Cup

About Teance View company

Company description not available.

8 Tasting Notes

97
911 tasting notes

The husband caught a whiff of this while we were in the bulk teas section of the grocery store so I picked up a little bit to sample. This stuff is selling for $199.99 a pound! Goodness. I hope this is good but I’ve never had much luck with enjoying gyokuro. But eh, that’s the joy of bulk food buying – I can try just a little.

I’m going to up late tonight so I’m not too concerned with caffeine so I went ahead and did the suggested 4g of leaf in 6oz of water. I’m really surprised at how nice the leaf looks considering where I got it. Dark green, clear, somewhat silky (not silky enough to be super-fresh but fresh enough, I think). Dry it smells both clean and buttery.

And now I remember one reason I rarely drink gyokuro. I’m impatient for the water to cool. Sigh. But finally, the water is ready and in 45s I’ll have some gyokuro.

Mmm, okay, this is good. Very clean tasting but still sweet. Makes me think of honeydew melon. There’s also a thicker taste that gets mixed in there. What I assume they are calling butter but the husband says reminds him of Le Sueur very young sweet peas (a household favorite). I can see both butter and pea-like but waffle between the two. Ultimately, it is more a feeling of creaminess than an actual taste for me.

I can see why this is supposedly award-winning. This is good. The husband thought so too as he tried to drink about half my cup. Depending on how subsequent steeps go, this tea might get my elusive 5 star rating.

ETA:
Steep 2 – pour started at 5s. OMG, it’s buttered grass. So awesome.
Steep 3 – pour started at 1min. This steep isn’t as intense as the first two. Should have done 1:15 – 1:30. Still nice (if light). Tastes like thin honey.

Preparation
140 °F / 60 °C 0 min, 45 sec
Cofftea

2 things… 4g/6oz? HOLY COW! and 2nd… your GROCERY STORE sells a $199.99/lb tea? Where do you do your grocery shopping? lol:)

Auggy

4g/6oz is pretty standard for Japanese greens, especially because such a short steep time is used. It ensures there is a strong enough flavor after just 45s. Teance’s site recommends a range of 4-5gs for 6-8oz but I’ve seen some growers that recommend a 1g/1oz ratio.

The grocery story we use is Central Market. They are owned by HEB and, from my understanding, is their upscale/specialty grocery store. They carry mostly natural and organic stuff so I can find things without any corn in them. Their bulk tea section is pretty nice. They’ve got a couple of Darjeelings that run about $80 – 90 per pound and are really quite fantastic. They carry Rishi, ROT, Teance, SerendipiTea, Planet Tea, David’s Tea and maybe one or two others.

teaplz

Oh mah gah Auggy I hope you didn’t buy an entire pound of this! Although that would be highly amusing. And your grocery store sounds awesome. :)

Auggy

Hahah! No way! I got $4.00 worth – less than half an ounce! And it is my favorite place on earth. Seriously. Favorite.

East Side Rob

To echo Cofftea’s comment, clearly Texas is the place to do your grocery shopping, the advantage perhaps of living in a state that’s just so big and where grocery stores and supermarkets have room to stock things. If you’re claustrophobic, you don’t ever want to go into a New York City supermarket, Auggy. Although we do have speciality tea stores. But good tea in the supermarket? Generally not in New York, except for Food Emporium, which we derisively call Food Delirium, because when you get to the cash register and learn how much your groceries are going to cost, you tend to get a tad woozy.

Auggy

Central Market isn’t that huge but it’s a total foodie place. Probably not unlike your Food Emporium because, yeah. Not cheap. But they have tons of stuff that I can actually eat compared to a natural grocery store which is somewhat difficult for me to find stuff in. Plus, their produce section is super-fun. Dragon fruit, pepino melons, purple potatoes, black garlic… I have way too much fun there.

teaplz

East Side Rob, you’re going to have to eventually give me a list of your favorite tea rooms in NYC. And yeah, the supermarkets in Manhattan tend to be… tight. Although the outer boroughs tend to have roomier places.

Ricky

Well my post was a little late. Is it me or is steepster exceptionally slow today.

$1 for 2.25g isn’t that horrible I suppose. I mean that’s the price of GM’s samplers. (Assuming my math is correct, but I’m in need of some caffeine)

Auggy

I think your math is right, Ricky. So it’s about $2.00 per cup (since you need to use 4 – 5 g per cup) which really isn’t bad (and doesn’t take into account the fact that you can do multiple steeps). But compared to most teas, it’s still pretty steep. From what I see on their webpage, though, that price is pretty good for this tea. I’m wondering if it is older when it is sold to CM so it is discounted?

takgoti

This sounds AWESOME. I want some!

Jillian

About the only tea you’d find in bulk in grocery stores here in BC is Red Rose teabags. I have to say I’m jealous Auggy! ;)

GREEN TEA TV

sounds great!! I am moving up to SF soon! I can’t wait.!!!

East Side Rob

Teaplz, when you say tea rooms, are you asking about tea salons (places to have afternoon tea) or tea purveyors (places to buy quality loose-leaf teas)?

teaplz

Both, actually! I’ve been getting into loose leaf slowly but surely, and I know that NYC isn’t a huge tea-drinking city. Most of my friends are heavily into coffee, and the most they’ll ever touch is a Chai Tea Latte from Starbucks. I haven’t explored the city yet for tea, and I’m always looking for recommendations as to where I should go.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

93
186 tasting notes

Let’s just get this out of the way: Auggy is a goddess.

No, seriously. Because I think I’ve finally gotten what all the hullabaloo has been about Japanese greens.

I’m perpetually amazed at how different various permutations of tea can be. Not only through the white – black scale, but from different companies and different preparations. It’s almost frightening. I thought I pretty much knew what gyokuro was about from the Harney & Sons version I had a few weeks ago.

I thought wrong. Completely wrong.

Gyokuro is one of those teas that’s beautiful to look at. I don’t think that photos do it justice. The leaves are silky and a deep blue-green, most thinner than a toothpick. Really gorgeous stuff. The smell coming off them is a sweet, very grassy note, with just a hint of butter.

So I waited… and waited… and waited for the damned water to cool down enough to begin steeping this one. I believe I started the pour at 50 secs, just because I really wanted to make sure that this one didn’t oversteep. It’s that delicate. I also steeped with the lid off, to give the gyokuro some room to breathe. I don’t want to scorch the leaves in ANY way.

I knew immediately while the tea was pouring that this was going to be something special. The smell… oh my gahd. Very grass, but also very, very buttery. Mmmmm. The wet leaves smelled much the same. It’s like a freshly cut grass smell, mixed with melted butter. It smells delicious.

And the taste? Joygasm. Seriously.

I’ve been having a lot of trouble with greens, I think mainly because in general, I tend to dislike green things. I really don’t like vegetables. I hate salads. Beyond artichokes and asparagus, and maybe the occasional piece of broccoli… yeah, they’re not my thing. But this tea… it’s lighter than Harney’s gyokuro, but just as intense and interesting. It’s pretty grassy, but that grassiness is tempered by butter. Rich butter. It’s silky-smooth and delicious and satisfying and REFRESHING. You can taste the award-winningness of this one.

There’s just this general sweetness to the entire cup as well. There’s really no astringency. Towards the end of some sips I sometimes get this almost tart feeling that develops just into a green sweetness. It’s almost similar to the sweetness you find in sugar snap peas (another green thing that I love).

I think Auggy just converted me with one cup of tea. I can’t wait to see what the second steep tastes like, although I probably won’t drink the entire thing, since gyokuro’s caffeine levels are off the charts. But DELICIOUS and NOM. Wow. Taste the quality!

The Second Steep (5 secs, 140 degrees) was pretty tasty, but a bit thinner than the first. The taste was a bit more grassy and a bit less buttery. Hrm. I’ll try to get a third steep out of this, but I doubt I’m going to finish the cup at all. It’ll be just for tasting purposes! NOM, though!

So Steep Three (1:10, 140 degrees) just sort of tasted like grassy umami water. Not that it was bad, but there’s no tea-ness to it. So I dumped the leaves out. I also played around with the wet leaves a bit, and they’re as soft as silk.

Preparation
140 °F / 60 °C 1 min, 0 sec
Auggy

YAY! Yeah, this is one seriously yummy cup. Mmm, I might need to have some tonight…

teaplz

Whee, you are seriously awesome in multiple ways for sending this to me. Deliciousness! Also, reading about the tea creator and all the awards and such was a real treat on the Teance website! There’s a lot of care that went into this, and you can definitely taste it.

Auggy

I’m seriously so pleased I can get this at my grocery store. Because I will totally be getting more of this. Even though it’s pretty freakin expensive. Totally worth it.

teaplz

Is it just a run-of-the-mill local grocery store? I wish my grocery store had tea like this!

Auggy

It’s sort of a foodie/specialty store really. Mostly organic/natural foods along with random, hard to find culinary weirdness (like black garlic, dragonfruit and yuzu!). It’s sort of like my candy store. I luf it.

S

This sounds awesome…adding it to my shopping list.

takgoti

HEE. ♥.

Christeana

I really like your descriptions. I have enjoyed the flavor of Gyokuro brewed with ice cubes. Take a little more than you would use hot, in a cup and as the ice melts, the delicate flavors are immediately available. I could hardly wait, and kept adding ice to the cup over, and over. It definitley leaves room for trials, but not much error. Enjoy.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

88
260 tasting notes

Auggy was kind enough to send me a little of this. This is the first gyokuro I’ve made myself and I wanted to do it up right so I got a kyusu. The tea arrived here before the kyusu did, so there was a bit of an internal battle going on until I got my Rishi stuff. I was literally, at one point, standing and staring at this tea until I caught myself and shook myself out of it.

Anyhow, I was good and I waited. I’m not sure what difference making this in the kyusu made, but I liked rocking and swishing the stuff out.

I read/heard/saw somewhere that gyokuros are supposed to sit for 5 or so minutes in cold/room temperature water to open them up and keep them from before steeping them warm. That’s something that’s stuck with me for some reason, but I’m also not sure how specific that is to the type of gyokuro, and whatnot. I’ve also read many different things about water to leaf ratios and the temperature of water that’s “supposed” to be used for hot/warm infusions. I’ve heard that you’re not supposed to use water hotter than 160°F and that you should infuse in ice water. What all of this has led me to believe is that I just need to drink a lot more gyokuro and see what slams my door.

Anyway, I let this sit in some room temperature for five minutes. [I did try to drink that but it was relatively flavorless.] Then I did about four steeps at 1 minute in 140°F water, all of which tasted relatively the same. I probably could have kept going, to be honest, and I make a face as I type this – I think I might have wasted the leaves as a result. I also see that Auggy has varied her steeping times for different infusions [which is what you’re probably supposed to do]. Luckily, I have some left of this to play around with, so I’ll have to try steeping otherwise. I think I’m going to try and read some more about these before I do, because right now I’m very much saturated with conflicting information and I think some of it’s going to begin dripping out if I don’t try and filter and sort some of it.

All right, enough about my brain scream over “proper” gyokuro steeping. The tea. The tea was good! I really doubt that this truly shows the range of where this can go, but I enjoyed what I got out of it and that’s a good thing. What I was missing was that buttery taste that both the description and Auggy both mentioned. I was searching for it, and I think that maybe because I was I thought I caught a glimpse of it, but that could have been purely psychological. What I did get was a vegetal taste followed by a delicious, chlorophyll-y sweetness. The sweetness was bright and high and clear, and only grew in volume when accompanied by inhalation. It also, and I’m really not sure how to describe this accurately, it tingled. It hopped around on my tongue.

This experience has intrigued me enough to really become interested in gyokuro, so I think I’ll be trying to procure some more and do a little experimenting.

Also, should you be interested, pictures of the new kyusu begin here [they are, however, without tea]. http://bit.ly/5oRgh0

Preparation
140 °F / 60 °C 1 min, 0 sec
Carolyn

Very pretty kyusu. It looks calming and minimalist. I created a place in the Discussion area for us to put pictures and video of our teapots and accessories. This would be a good one for that spot, I think. (If you don’t mind having it in two places.)

My beloved called your Sorapot video and my most recent one “tea porn”. I think he just doesn’t understand the joy of gazing at the perfect beauty of teaware. :)

takgoti

Oooh, I’ll go check that out. And so far as the tea porn, HAH, maybe I should switch the song out for a little bow chika bow wow music.

Carolyn

He expanded on his theory further, saying that your video even features a teapot strip act (when you removed it from the wrapping). He says all your video lacked was a Sorapot pole dance.

takgoti

I would totally try to figure out how to do that if I didn’t fear somehow managing to break it.

Ricky

OhHhh that kyusu looks nice! Great photos as well. I have no clue how to wing Gyokuro’s 140F. I might have to hold off on trying it.

takgoti

Thanks! I agonized over the choice, and the photos…well, I clearly like the tea pr0n. What do you mean, “wing” the 140? Do you mean you don’t have a thermometer or am I just not understanding?

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

84
4 tasting notes

So I bought some gyokuro from englishteastore.com for an almost too good to be true price. So I was skeptical about its quality considering that most places charge 3 times the amount. So far I’m not that impressed. Maybe its a lower end gyokuro or something. I’ve experimented with a range of temps and steep times….100-160 and 1 second to 2 minutes. The later steeps are shortest. I looked online about ways to prepare it and the customary japanese method is very complicated but super cool! And they eat the leaves afterwards. He used vinegar and sesame oil so I tryed the same and it was delicious! It tasted like a seaweed salad from a sushi restaurant. Its nice to know how healthy it is too.
So most of my steeps are a little bitter despite using very low steep times and low temps. And I don’t use the last few drops becasue thats typically the most bitter. I heard that the more rolled up the leave the higher end it is. And these are maybe a little tighter rolled than my stock sencha. I ‘ll just keep experimenting. I’ve have had a couple lucky steeps that taste way better than the regular sencha so there is hope!

Preparation
140 °F / 60 °C 1 min, 0 sec

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

76
5 tasting notes

I’ve had gyokuro from different sources but I think this is one of the best. It comes from Uji, which is the province of Japan that is best for green tea. It has a delicate and pretty high vegetal flavor, with a hint of sweetness at the end

Preparation
140 °F / 60 °C 0 min, 45 sec

Login or sign up to leave a comment.