Camellia Sinensis

Edit Company

Recent Tasting Notes

86

This is my first 7581. For starters, I cannot for the life of me figure out what the D denotes in the naming by Camellia Sinensis, whom this tea is from, but their reputation is great, so I have no doubt this is authentic. 2004, from what I have found, was during an odd time for Pu Erh production, and for CCCP Pu Erh especially. From what I have sussed out, the Kunming factory, while not directly CCCP, is affiliated with and produced tea under their labels/management, however they are also known to have made some of the better and more consistent teas of the group. (https://teadb.org/cnnp-zhongcha/)

Anyways, on to the tea. I’ve brewed this 2-3 times now, each time learning the tea and making better choices. On it’s own it has some salt to it, not much wo dui dampness, but enough to have a velvety soil smell, like fresh forest floor. It is on the peppery side, with an astringency and a very slight ‘kick’ that makes it stand out for other shou. Better to use a little extra leaf although the chunks are somewhat delicate and prone to crumbling if you try to peel them apart.

As I’ve learned this tea, I’ve decided to throw in a punch of the Rishi Tea loose Pu erh, which has a much richer wo dui mustiness and a half to one whole Chrysanthemum pod. The Rishi Pu Erh provides a smokiness and mustiness that the original tea is lacking and the Chrysanthemum pod accentuates the spice characteristics that this tea has. All together, they balance to complement this fine red tea. I would definitely place this firmly on the spice/soil side of Pu Erh as opposed to the must/wo dui side.

It is a coating flavor, finishing at the back of the palate, and leaves a nice lingering astringency that is pleasant if you avoid overbrewing. Mildly drying, not a problem though.

Notes of mushrooms, broth, roasted root vegetables, forest floor, wet rocks, salt, minerality, wet metal, dry heartwoods, black pepper

Flavors: Black Pepper, Broth, Forest Floor, Metallic, Mineral, Mushrooms, Salt, Wet Rocks

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

86

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

74

Tried this one a variety of ways this morning/afternoon and it’s pretty meh for me. Not sure if i’m missing the boat with this one but i’ll be setting aside the rest of this for friends to try in the hopes that they have a better experience with this. It’s not a BAD tea…just boring? uneventful? un exciting? :)

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

74

Not sure how i feel about this one. I’m going to have to have this one again. It’s not unpleasant but i’m not sure it’s really doing anything for me. It has a sweetness to it that i like, but there’s an aftertaste that reminds me of something that i can’t quite place. I’ll have to explore this one a little more later :)

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

80

This 2017 harvest is actually DJ-16, which I think means that it’s a slightly earlier invoice. In the bag, it smells like dried flowers, herbs, and stonefruit. After a 3:30 steep at 195F, these flavours become more prominent. There’s not a lot of astringency, and the peach and muscatel make this tea pleasantly sweet, balancing out the herbaceousness that I think is characteristic of FF Darjeelings.

A five-minute second steep is surprisingly good, though I’ve learned from experience not to push it beyond that to “extract all the flavour!”

Flavors: Drying, Floral, Herbaceous, Muscatel, Peach, Stonefruits

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 3 min, 30 sec 2 tsp 16 OZ / 476 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

85

I’ve sampled every harvest of this oolong since I started drinking loose-leaf tea in 2015, so you could say it’s an all-time favourite. There are teas that are more complex, last longer, and get more attention online, but I keep coming back to this one because of its approachability.

Just as the description from Camellia Sinensis promises, it hits you with strong cherry, coconut, and wheatgrass notes. (I probably couldn’t have put my finger on the wheatgrass flavour if the website hadn’t mentioned it, but once you know what to look for, it’s unmistakable.) Unfortunately, the tea doesn’t have staying power, usually losing its fruitiness and turning vegetal by around the sixth gongfu steep. Alternatively, I can get three good Western infusions out of it. At $20 CAD for 50 grams, it’s also a decent price for an oolong from this area.

This is a wonderful everyday tea—not so complex that I need to think about it, and bold enough to stay interesting.

Flavors: Cherry, Coconut, Floral, Sweet, warm grass

Preparation
0 OZ / 0 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

I’m transitioning from a day to a night shift sleeping schedule tonight… which means I’m ingesting an alarming amount of tea. I did an all at once side-by-side of a 1st, 2nd, and autumnal flush Darjeeling to get an initial feel for how they compare side by side. Because I’m sleepy and minimally functional I grandpa-style brewed them fairly cool.

This 1st flush was honestly my least favorite of the three flushes! It was the most citrusy and astringent, with a light colored and sweetly fragrant liqueur. I was surprised at any bitterness at all considering the temperature of the water but then again I’m particularly sensitive when it comes to bitterness. I double and triple checked the listing which claims this is a black tea. I haven’t had darjeeling before this experiment but I SWEAR this is a green with its light floral flavors, quick-to-go-bitter tendency and lack of any rounder notes. Is this typical of first flush Darjeelings? Is this just because I brewed it a little haphazardly? Am I going insane in my exhaustion?

A future gongfu session will secure a rating. Until then, I’ll call this one “meh.”

Flavors: Lemon Zest

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 3 min, 0 sec 2 g 6 OZ / 177 ML
Helena

I feel your pain. Being a shift worker can be tough sometimes.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

I’m transitioning from a day to a night shift sleeping schedule which means I’m ingesting an alarming amount of tea. I did a side-by-side of a 1st, 2nd, and autumnal flush Darjeeling to get an initial feel for how they compare side by side. Because I’m sleepy and minimally functional I grandpa-style brewed them fairly cool.

I found this to be the most enjoyable of the three flushes. A delightful light-toasty and nutty dry leaf aroma that made a pleasant amber liquid. Tastes like cherries, oak, nuts, brown sugar. Supposedly this one has decent muscatel notes but I still don’t have any idea what that means. . . it’s possible my extremely gentle hand with this brew wouldn’t have extracted that flavor this round anyway.

Flavors: Brown Sugar, Cherry Wood, Nuts, Wood

Preparation
2 tsp 6 OZ / 177 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

I’m transitioning from a day to a night shift sleeping schedule which means I’m ingesting an alarming amount of tea. I did a side-by-side of a 1st, 2nd, and autumnal flush Darjeeling to get an initial feel for how they compare side by side. Because I’m sleepy and minimally functional I grandpa-style brewed them fairly cool.

I think this was the most interesting and complex of the three, almost like a blend of the first two! It had both caramel and citrus notes, not competing, almost taking turns on the palate. Very interesting.

Flavors: Caramel, Citrus, Wood

Preparation
2 tsp 6 OZ / 177 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

This is my first review on Steepster! And, since offbeat variations on well-known tea types tend to interest me, this black tea from Guangdong is a good place to start.

Other than having tart, berry notes and long, twisty leaves, however, this doesn’t remind me much of a Dan Cong, but instead recalls some other Chinese black teas I’ve had. It’s sweet (Camellia Sinensis’s mention of barley sugar is accurate), peanuty, slightly floral, and most importantly, forgiving. It’s comforting and balanced, and I’ll especially enjoy this as an autumn brew.

I steeped slightly more than 3 teaspoons of leaf in a 120 ml porcelain teapot at 195F for 25, 15, 25, 40, 55, 70, and 180 seconds.

Preparation
3 tsp 4 OZ / 120 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

I bought this as part of the 2017 Taiwan Tasting Kit. While it’s not the most outstanding tea in the world, it’s well worth the regular price of $10/50g. Like other Four Seasons I’ve had, it’s tangy and floral with hints of vanilla. It also has a spicy note in the first few steeps that is really enjoyable. Unfortunately, it gets vegetal quickly, petering out around steep six. I could see myself restocking this tea, but it’s not a priority.

I steeped 5 grams in a 120 ml porcelain teapot at around 200f for 25, 20, 25, 30, 30, 40, 50, and 100 seconds.

Flavors: Floral, Flowers, Spicy, Tangy, Vegetal

Preparation
5 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

10

You can get many better teas for the same price. The flavours are atypical of an Assam 2nd flush tea — I don’t even think this was a “real” Assam.

Flavors: Artificial, Honey

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 3 min, 30 sec 2 tsp 7 OZ / 207 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

40

It was part of our tea tasting at Tea Drunk with my friend Tynan and the guys from Budapest. It was our least favorite tea.

Preparation
8 min or more

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

77

So, I tried this one with the pumpkin agave too a few nights ago.

I had the idea that a while tea might be a nice compliment to the agave because it would be light enough to showcase the pumpkin notes in a prominent way and what straw/hay notes were present would only sort of add to that overall autumnal feel. I chose this white tea specifically purely because I just have so much of it on hand.

It didn’t really work though, and it came out very muddled and borderline cloying tasting. It’s almost like the taste of the agave was too present and it just ruined the base tea completely. I also forgot that this white tea has some pretty strong stonefruit notes and to be honest they just tasted weird with pumpkin. Pumpkin and peach? Not a strong match up…

It was drinkable, so I finished the cup but it’s not something I’ll be revisiting.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

77

Hot, and Western again…

Even though I’ve only had this tea one time prior to this cup, when I brewed this up it had such a strong familiarity to it – the kind of familiarity that definitely extends past trying it one prior time.

The taste was nice; very smooth with a surprisingly thick and viscous mouthfeel. The taste was a mix of hay, delicate malt, stonefruits (peach/nectarine/apricot), and autumnal leaves. If I had to pick a more abstract way to summarize the flavour I’d say it tasted the way that jumping into a pile of freshly raked, crisp orange autumn leaves feels

I liked it a lot.

Flavors: Apricot, Autumn Leaf Pile, Hot hay, Malt, Peach, Stonefruits

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

77

Nabbed this one with my last order because I’ve been curious for a while; and why not try it now? I can’t think of a reason not to…

I suppose what I expected from this one was pretty much your typical Shou Mei flavour but just with a lot more body? In a way, I suppose it is that. It’s got a very thick mouthfeel/liquor, and the overall flavour is relatively full bodied (for a white tea) with a lot of natural sweetness. The top notes and body are both pretty tangy, with some supporting hot hay notes. The finish is much smoother, and has a bit of a wood chip/dried wood sort of taste to it.

For a Western cup, this was interesting with a slightly above average sort of complexity to it. I imagine this would be quite nice and smooth Gong Fu, though my gut feeling is that it probably wouldn’t be a very long lasting session. Something worth trying, though.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

90

Dry stuff is Good ol’ apple-caramel crisp, extra butter.

Infuses in floral Oolong at first, lighter than expected, i’m getting a chalky/powdery vibe and some type of boiled pork or beef from the wet leaves, although, thats probably fancy renaissance bouquet for the educated noses out there, it really smells like the foamy stuff coming on top of a meaty broth.
It eventually releases full roundness and sweetness. Mainly Buttery florals but there is a milkshake thing coming in and out, great stuff.

Thanks Mr. Chang

Flavors: Blackberry, Butter, Caramel, Milk

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

90

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

69

Oddly spicy!

Notes of cumin, cinnamon, and bark and then the more typical notes of malt, and cocoa. If I hadn’t have known better, I almost would have said that the spicier elements of this tea reminded me of a Keemun (without the underlying fruity/jammy qualities) or August Uncommon’s Port of Shadows tea…

Very different compared to the last two cups I had, for sure.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

69

Take #2

I used the same amount of tea leaf this time, but with a shorter steep time. It was an improvement because this was a lot smoother mouthfeel wise, however there was also a faint watery quality to the flavour profile too. I mean, yes it was sweet and malty with honey and cocoa notes but it lacked body/presence.

More tweaking is probably needed still; maybe the same steep time as my first try but with less leaf?

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

69

So, I had a Camellia Sinensis order show up today! I actually placed the order not really for any tea in particular but because they were carrying an absolutely STUNNING jellyfish teacup that I just 100% needed to own. You guys don’t even understand; jellyfish have been my spirit animals as of late. They’re these gentle, floating water blobs that zap you when you get up in their personal space – how perfect is that!? Plus, all my good friends refer to me as an “asexual jellyfish”. I don’t know where that even originated, but it’s just a term now. So now I have this equally bad ass jellyfish teacup!

Anyway; while I was ordering I DID pick up some tea too – because you just gotta. That’s how addiction works. I chose this one because I have tried a Columbian Bitaco tea before and I thought it would be interesting to compare the two mentally, especially since this one was a pretty reasonable price.

The dry leaf for this one is really sweet smelling with distinct notes of honey, cocoa, and graham crackers that definitely piqued my interest/curiosity. Steeped up, it’s kind of similar to the dry aroma? I mean, it’s got hints of malt and honey but it’s also pretty brisk and full bodied with a thicker mouthfeel and a somewhat astringent and tannic finish. Also, a bit of a burnt sugar sort of flavour, too.

I mean so far my initial impression is that I like the other black Bitaco tea better it was smoother, and it had this very fascinating anise flavour to it. However, I think some tweaking could produce a very interesting infusion. Either less leaf, or less steeping time would probably fix the astringency and I bet milk and sugar or honey would make for a really nice breakfast tea with some of those honey notes getting exaggerated nicely.

Definitely excited to see where this tea will go.

Current rating is a conservative 69, with the belief that appropriate tweaking will result in a brew deserving of a better score.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

75

this oolong from crowkettle is sort of middle of the road oolong. it’s not really roasted or super green…it’s just kinda…an oolong lol. Appreciate the share crowkettle as i for sure wouldn’t be picking these out myself but i DO like to try them :)

Login or sign up to leave a comment.