Taiwan Li Shan Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Cream, Floral, Grass, Orchid, Peach, Peas, Smooth, Spinach, Sweet, Vegetal, Flowers, Fruity, Nectar, Sugarcane, Almond, Butter, Custard, Green Apple, Honeysuckle, Lime, Mineral, Pear, Vanilla
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Kawaii433
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 0 sec 5 g 4 oz / 121 ml

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15 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Swap Sample Sipdown! (16 | 85) This was one of many oolong samples that the lovely Kawaii433 saw fit to share with me! So full disclosure, li shan and ali shan oolong are not my favorites. They...” Read full tasting note
  • “There are already some fantastic, detailed reviews on this tea (Reason I tried it and thank you all. :D I so so so enjoy and appreciate all of you who do detailed reviews.) so I’ll just add that...” Read full tasting note
    92
  • “I received this as a freebie with my last order, which Alistair graciously handled after an unrelated to this tea request. Incredible customer service. I’ve been enjoying my few days alone and the...” Read full tasting note
    92
  • “A light floral & citrus high mountain oolong…very smooth, light, complex. Delicious. Now on to my 3rd steep. (Spring 2017 Harvest). I was just on the perusing the What-Cha website- looks like...” Read full tasting note
    90

From What-Cha

A wonderful and complex oolong which evolves with each subsequent steep. It possesses a lovely floral quality while tones of citrus, fruit and nut gradually reveal themselves.

Sourced direct from Mountain Tea.

Tasting Notes:

- Very smooth texture

- Complex taste which evolves

- Floral quality with notes of citrus, fruit and nut which develop with subsequent steeps

Origin: Li Shan mountain range, Nantou, Taiwan

Cultivar: Qing Xin

Oxidation: 20%

Roast: 0%

Altitude: 2000m+

Brewing Advice:

- Heat water to roughly 85C/185°F

- Use 1 teaspoon per cup/small teapot

- Brew for 1-2 minute

- Always remove the leaves from the water once the tea has brewed

- Re-use the leaves multiple times and increase steeping time with each subsequent infusion

- Best without milk

We always recommend experimenting with any new tea, to find the parameters which suit you best

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

15 Tasting Notes

1527 tasting notes

Swap Sample Sipdown! (16 | 85)

This was one of many oolong samples that the lovely Kawaii433 saw fit to share with me!

So full disclosure, li shan and ali shan oolong are not my favorites. They have a tendency to be quite floral, which is not an attribute that I love in tea.

This one was quite floral as well. The rinse was creamy and delicious with light peach notes, and it probably should have occurred to me to start with shorter steeps because of that. But it didn’t, so I started my first steep at 25s. Next time, I think I’ll start at 15s (at most) for gaoshan.

So the first several steeps were very strong on the floral notes. There were also some sweet peach, grass, pea, and spinach notes in the background. I didn’t find the overall flavor to change a lot during this time, which surprised me. But this may have been a side effect of my poor brewing parameters.

I did really start to enjoy this tea in the last few steeps though, where the flowers faded a bit and I could appreciate the soft grass, vegetal, and fruit notes more.

I will say, every single steep of this tea had an amazing sweet aftertaste that lingered forever. I’m not sure if that was what is referred to as hui gan, or not? Either way, I could definitely appreciate that this is a very good quality tea, even if it isn’t my personal “cup of tea”. ;)

Flavors: Cream, Floral, Grass, Orchid, Peach, Peas, Smooth, Spinach, Sweet, Vegetal

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 5 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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92
207 tasting notes

There are already some fantastic, detailed reviews on this tea (Reason I tried it and thank you all. :D I so so so enjoy and appreciate all of you who do detailed reviews.) so I’ll just add that I’ve been enjoying this tea throughout the week. A complex taste which evolves: Fruit, floral, nuts, citrusy. What-Cha has my all-time favorite sticky rice oolong, and I love their Vietnamese Oolongs too. This is an exceptional and smooth Li-Shan.

Yixing teapot, 5g, 110ml, 194°F, 9 steeps, 25s, 35s, 45s, 55s, 1m5s, 1m10s, 1m15s, 1m25s, 1m35s

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec 5 g 4 OZ / 110 ML

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92
317 tasting notes

I received this as a freebie with my last order, which Alistair graciously handled after an unrelated to this tea request. Incredible customer service.

I’ve been enjoying my few days alone and the long weekend. Phone off – sorry friends and family, no Labor Day activities for me. Just catching up on some physics and engineering coursework, interspersed with furry meowmeowkittymeowmeow bonding and more tea than usual. I should get outside after this, though. It’s a beautiful day, cool and not so sunny that I want to stay in the apartment with curtains closed. I guess it’s not quite summer here yet. This tea seemed like a natural pick for the weather.

June 2018 harvest. Gone gaiwan. 3g, 60mL, 195F, 10s rinse, initial steeps at 10/12/15s then felt my way through the rest. 13 steeps total.

I can’t even begin to describe the floral component of this tea. I’m not there yet with high mountain oolongs but I think I can recognize this as a remarkable tea. I was floating while sipping and the tea managed to float above me.

The dry leaf smells like spring bulb flowers such as daffodil and hyacinth. The tea presents as thick and sweet in its aroma, its hour-long aftertaste and in the bottom of the cup. The liquor itself is fairly light-bodied. It starts out mellow with a bouquet of unplaceable-as-of-yet florals, citrus, asian pear, light vegetal, and mineral. Sugarcane, vanilla, sweet cream and a kind of nuttiness like macadamia move in and get cozy, with a cooling sensation showing up in later steeps. The tea seems to just keep ramping up over the course of the session with no extreme changes and never a question of whether I should change the temperature. Very intuitive – I never timed anything beyond the first 3 steeps. It flows incredibly well. Really pleasant energy.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 3 g 2 OZ / 60 ML

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90
75 tasting notes

A light floral & citrus high mountain oolong…very smooth, light, complex. Delicious. Now on to my 3rd steep.
(Spring 2017 Harvest). I was just on the perusing the What-Cha website- looks like Alistair is running low on this one so if you want to purchase, now is the time.

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95
348 tasting notes

I’ve been wanting to try this Li Shan for while since it has gotten such rave reviews on Steepster. After finally getting my hands on a sample, I have to say this was worth the hype. Love it when that happens :-)

The leaves of this tea are rolled into giant green nuggets that have a fresh orchid scent. Wet leaf aroma is extraordinarily sweet with florals reminiscent of hyacinth and daffodils. The tea started off fairly thin and light with a bit of sugarcane. Figuring the water temperature was too low, I upped it to 200 F from 190 F to help bring out more flavor in the second steep. Out came a thick nectar of wildflowers and honeycomb. The following steep I used just under boiling water and got more pastoral flowers, minerality, and a fairly viscous mouthfeel that was very soothing. I was really beginning to feel the cha qi at this point.

From there on out, I used straight up boiling water for the next 6 steeps. It went through a complex taste evolution going from buttery to brothy and then fruity; all the while maintaining a distinct gao shan flavor. Interestingly enough, this tea was mostly fruity in the later steeps with little to no vegetal tones unlike other Li shan’s I’ve tried. I loved its sumptuous fruitiness and powerful cha qi. Also impressive was the incredible staying power that lasted through 9 steeps without any bitterness whatsoever.

After 2 sessions with this sample, I had slightly less than 2 grams left which I brewed western style. Though lighter, the western steep brought out more of the tea’s floral aspects into play.

Really impressed with this offering from What-Cha. It’s complexity and evolution of taste over infusions was quite nice. Definitely going to get some more of this tea with my next order.

Flavors: Flowers, Fruity, Nectar, Sugarcane, Sweet

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 45 sec 4 g 3 OZ / 80 ML

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93
761 tasting notes

I managed to squeeze in another oolong session this evening. This tea was one that I had been meaning to try for some time. What-Cha’s Taiwanese oolongs seem to enjoy a good reputation here and elsewhere, so my hopes were high. Fortunately, this tea lived up to expectations.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 185 F water for 10 seconds. I followed this infusion up with 12 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 12 seconds, 15 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, and 3 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves emitted pleasant aromas of cream, butter, grass, and flowers. After the rinse, more distinct impressions of lilac, honeysuckle, and hyacinth emerged, as did traces of vanilla and custard. The first infusion produced a similar bouquet with a very light hint of citrus. In the mouth, I detected mild notes of cream, butter, vanilla, custard, sweetgrass, hyacinth, lilac, and honeysuckle. I did not pick up any citrus. Subsequent infusions revealed hints of lily and magnolia chased by lime zest, green apple, pear, and a faint hint of almond. A lively mineral presence began to emerge toward the back of the throat at this point. Later infusions were dominated by minerals, sweetgrass, cream, butter, and almond, while extremely faint citrus impressions lingered in the background.

This was a very interesting and satisfying high mountain oolong. Though its peak was very brief, the tea remained enjoyable on one level or another throughout the session. I could definitely see this being a rock solid oolong for regular consumption and would recommend it highly to anyone looking for a respectable Li Shan oolong that will not entirely break the bank.

Flavors: Almond, Butter, Cream, Custard, Floral, Grass, Green Apple, Honeysuckle, Lime, Mineral, Pear, Vanilla

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
Evol Ving Ness

Nice. Very nice.

Daylon R Thomas

I second that. It’s a flexible brew for me: it does fine western, gong fu, and grandpa.

Daylon R Thomas

You know I second that. It’s actually my favorite because of how approachable it is. I’m not sure if it has for you, but I’m able to brew it gong fu, western, and grandpa style which is why I love it so much.

eastkyteaguy

You know, I have yet to try it Western or grandpa. I have lately found myself getting stuck in patterns with regard to certain types of tea. For some reason, I always want to save oolongs, pu-erh, and Chinese black teas for gongfu sessions. I tend to favor non-Chinese black teas, black tea blends, green teas, tisanes, and white teas Western style. I’m not sure why I do that. I have quite a bit of this left though, so I’m thinking of trying a multi-step Western process with it.

Daylon R Thomas

Sounds awesome. I usually use 3 grams or less in my 16 ounce tumbler for Grandpa, and the same amount western and was surprised how well it worked. I have around 30 grams left myself, so I’ve been slowly switching to western and granpa lately to savor what’s left. I savor my favorite teas too and I’m the same way western with the varieties you just listed with the exception of white teas.

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97
1068 tasting notes

It’s my birthday, and I had an awesome morning despite the schlew of grading, writing, thinking, resume writing, a leak from a whole into the tar roof into my mother’s rooms walls, and the sharp, icy rain. My bloodsugar is still high from some salmon and steak hibachi, and I had this tea, so I should not be complaining.

I had to visit this one to see how it pans as my favorite. I started out with the Qilan What-Cha offers at midnight, and woke up this morning with the new Taiwan Amber GABA Oolong, and this tea to gage how my preferences have changed at age 23.

I’ve found that I’ve like a little bit more baking and maturity in my oolongs, and I have not drank my nucelar Gaoshans as religiously as I used to….never mind I still cling to them like the occasional Hail Mary of an uncommitted Catholic, but a little more. The crisp apple notes and fruity florals are still there in its soothing creamy texture, but it actually came out as being noticeably grassier than the GABA and not quite as sweet. This was creamy verdant sweet, whereas the GABA is its own category of mineral, rock sugar, pear, and light yet “rocky” roast. A part of me preferred the GABA, but I still would have a hard time parting with this tea or its type. The GABA has the benefits as having the pear notes a high mountain oolong would with very short steeps, but it is not going to be as verdant or spring like as this one when I need it to be.

So in short, I have gotten more attached to oolongs with more roast, but I still cannot part with my gaoshans, or this tea for that mattter, for a while, though I might not get as large quantities of it as I used to.

Evol Ving Ness

Happy birthday to you, Daylon R. Thomas!

Here’s to another year of splendid teas!

ashmanra

Happy birthday!

CrowKettle

Happy birthday! :)

Daylon R Thomas

Thanks everyone!

mrmopar

Sorry to be late. Storm took out most of my communications. Happy Belated!

LuckyMe

happy birthday. i too have found myself gravitating away from green oolongs lately. still love them, but don’t crave them the way i used to.

Daylon R Thomas

I started out thinking I’d be hooked to darker oolongs and ripe pu-erh’s because I love roasted coffee so much, but I went green, super green, and now a little more medium.

eastkyteaguy

Happy belated birthday!

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95
13 tasting notes

This is for the Spring 2016 harvest.

Wow this tea is amazing! I really love high mountain teas, so I ordered a sample of this – should’ve gotten a larger bag! The liquid is a very pretty light glowing amber color. It’s very smooth and slightly floral. Had me going “mmm” every sip! I bought a tumbler of this to my all-day test and it got me through the day.

I western brewed this, but I will try gongfu with the rest of my sample to reveal the complexities of the flavor.

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 2 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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