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Tea type
Herbal Tea
Ingredients
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by Hikari
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 min, 45 sec 8 oz / 236 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “OK, time for some tealess stuff now that it's late. When I opened this tonight I was a little skeptical I'd like it--it really does just look like straight up unprocessed planty green tree leaves,...” Read full tasting note
    ifjuly 606 tasting notes
  • “I quite like bamboo teas. Of the teas I have tried so far, the bamboo leaves seems to be quite large. By that I mean, there were quite large cut up/chunked up pieces of light green leaf. This...” Read full tasting note
    65
    Lala1 709 tasting notes

From Harney & Sons

Bamboo is found near many tea farms, and on all our trips to China eating fresh bamboo meals is always a highlight. We are pleased to offer dried bamboo leaves for your drinking pleasure. Although not really tea, the pretty green leaves steep into a light, vegetal, and sweet brew.

About Harney & Sons View company

Since 1983 Harney & Sons has been the source for fine teas. We travel the globe to find the best teas and accept only the exceptional. We put our years of experience to work to bring you the best Single-Estate teas, and blends beyond compare.

2 Tasting Notes

606 tasting notes

OK, time for some tealess stuff now that it’s late. When I opened this tonight I was a little skeptical I’d like it—it really does just look like straight up unprocessed planty green tree leaves, needle-shaped and fluffy, hard to spoon out—figured it might be how non-tea people often dismiss tea as just tasting like some weak plant matter in hot water. Very surprised to find it steeps up a brilliant, almost glowing neon yellow-green color, and tastes quite sweet and clean, a bit like grapefruit. Really enjoying that Asian-y (which is to say fresh, not candied like Sweet Tarts) sweet-and-sour flavor. I could totally see drinking this any time of day when I want the bright sweetness of fresh-squeezed citrus juice but also something to warm and comfort me (making actual hot orange or grapefruit juice seems kinda gross, no?). There’s something else to the aroma that adds dimension too—I want to say kind of like hay or straw or alfalfa, hard to pin down. I imagine this’d be delicious paired with the right kinds of foods, dishes that call for something citrus-sparkling clean and sweet. Yum! Just call me the panda at the tea party ’cause I really dig this, ha.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 5 min, 0 sec

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65
709 tasting notes

I quite like bamboo teas. Of the teas I have tried so far, the bamboo leaves seems to be quite large. By that I mean, there were quite large cut up/chunked up pieces of light green leaf. This tea, however, looks quite different. It is very skinny, long, slender dark green leaf, look very similar to flattened out pine needles. There are quite a few bunches of leaves that are still attached to a stem.

This tea definitely has a bamboo taste. But there is also something else there. Something very deeply vegetal, deeply woody. I know this is strange but the first thing that came to my mind was beef boullion, but without the saltiness, I am also thinking popcorn – its a bit weird. There is a thick, buttery quality to the tea that is similar to other bamboo teas I have tried.

This one is ok. I am not sure if there are different types of bamboo, but I am assuming there are different parts of the plant. But This one is ok, not my favorite bamboo tea.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 min, 15 sec 2 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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