Mountain Rose Herbs

Recent Tasting Notes

55

This one smells strong and very nice with a lot of mint and a bit of sweetness. Brewed up, it tones down a bit but still a very good and strong peppermint that’s not too sharp and smells wonderful. However, first, we will not be purchasing again as it’s labeled as organic but this, and every other item in our order came packaged in bags that had a tiny sticker that said “contains substances known in the state of California to cause cancer” I know that Ca has some strict rules but there’s some dichotomy buying organic and receiving a cancer causing notice concerning the packaging material or product itself. Second, of a slightly lesser consequence, it turns out that there’s a LOT of oils added into this blend which pretty much wrecks any storage vessel or cup with semi permeable materials like rubber or plastic commonly found in travel tumblers and air tight containers.

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35

Purchased a big bag of this and it’s quite medicinal (but expected that) and we will not be purchasing again. It’s labeled as organic but every item in our order came packaged in bags that had a tiny sticker that said “contains substances known in the state of California to cause cancer” I know that Ca has some strict rules but there’s some dichotomy buying organic and receiving a cancer causing notice concerning the packaging material or product itself.

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62

Not the biggest fan of this tea. While it has the potential for tasting great, it reminds me quite a bit of lipton black tea and seems to become bitter far too quickly. I haven’t brewed it to my satisfaction yet. I might need to mix it with a lighter black tea to get better results.

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70

This is my first time brewing it, but it has a pleasant color somewhere between rooibos and hibiscus, I suppose. The smell is mildly sweet and almost citrusy, and the taste isn’t overbearing. It doesn’t have a bitter taste, which is probably due to its low tannin content. I think this tea has a more mellow flavor than rooibos, so I prefer it.

A few interesting facts; honeybush gets its name from its flowers, because they smell like honey. The plant itself happens to be part of the legume family, so this tea produces isoflavones, a type of antioxidant not found in other teas.

Flavors: Floral, Fruity

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C

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96

This tea was awesome. The perfect amount of jasmine and green tea in one sip. It seems to be able to tolerate a little higher of a temp than most green teas as it wasn’t bitter when I steeped it on a higher temp the second time I made this tead, however, I would still steep on a lower temp overall. It has a hint of honey to it too. Definitely a new tea staple.

Flavors: Honey, Jasmine

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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By itself, this makes a caramel-honey tea that is quite sweet. I don’t like it alone, as it is a little too sweet for me, and has a slightly odd aftertaste, but it is good in quite a few blends.

Flavors: Caramel, Honey

Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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I use this mostly for blending. It tastes like vanilla and earth. I was a bit disappointed with the earthiness at first, but I’m starting to like it in some blends now. I usually use about a teaspoon/cup.

Flavors: Earth, Vanilla

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85

I tried plucking the petals out, and brewing them alone, and that definitely changed the flavor, but not how I would have expected. The grassy notes completely overwhelmed the pleasant floral taste from the other day, and the tea was extremely bitter. I’m assuming this is in fact because I plucked out the petals, and not because I brewed it a shorter length of time (the other day it ended up steeping for a couple of hours while I took a nap). I do not recommend separating the flowers when brewing this.

Flavors: Grass

Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more 2 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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90

I was surprised by the pale orange color of this powder. It smelled herbaceous and fruity.
I brewed it for at least 10 minutes in 4 oz of boiling water, then added 4 oz of cold water (This is what I usually do in the summer). The liquid had a mild fruity scent with a hint of oatmeal, and was a pale golden color (I think, this mug is green). I really enjoy the flavor, which is citrusy and faintly herbaceous, with a touch of oatmeal. I can see why this fruit is used in so many herbal blends

Flavors: Citrus, Herbs, Oats

Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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85

This was a pleasant, mild, and floral tea, with a faint hint of grassiness. It’s not entirely dissimilar to Chamomile tea. I’ve only had Chrysanthemum tea once before and it was several years ago, so I can’t really compare the flavors, but I enjoyed this. I’m wondering if the grassiness is part of the flavor of the flowers or if it’s because they are whole flowers, including part of the stem. I might experiment with that.

Flavors: Floral, Grass

Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more 2 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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30

I bought this because I’ve heard it’s the lemon flavored herb with the strongest taste of lemon. I hoped this meant that it wouldn’t be as grassy tasting as lemongrass, but no such luck. It’s grassy and somewhat minty, with a slight lemon flavor. I felt like the flavors clashed, and didn’t enjoy it much, but give it a whirl if you like lemongrass

Flavors: Grass, Lemon, Lemongrass, Mint

Preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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50

I ordered this because the Honeybush tea was out of stock. It’s not terrible, but it has more of the smokey, medicinal taste of Rooibos than I prefer. I probably won’t order it again.

Flavors: Medicinal, Smoke, Smooth, Wood

Preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec 2 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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90

I always keep Peppermint Tea in my cupboard, and drink a cup almost everyday. It’s a standard everyday tea for me. I’m not usually very picky about where I get it from, but I will probably buy primarily from Mountain Rose Herbs in the future. Their peppermint is both very cost effective (4 ounces is quite a lot of tea), and unlike most peppermint I’ve had, it doesn’t seem to become bitter if I leave it sitting in the cup after steeping.

Flavors: Mint, Peppermint

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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1

We know chrysanthemum tea, and have been drinking both white as well as less common varieties for 26 years. This tea may well be organic, which is nice, but the flavor is off, not just off, it’s terrible, medicinal, weird. I don’t know what’s wrong with it. We’ve used different water temperatures, more and fewer flowers— nothing helps. And this is new tea, packed in May of 2014 so it should be last fall’s crop. We ordered a giant bag, excited to find an organic chrysanthemum, and gave up— we just threw it away.

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 2 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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drank Dream Tea by Mountain Rose Herbs
1693 tasting notes

I had hid the Mountain Rose samples ashmanra sent me from Tazo (something catnippy in the packets made him extremely curious)…so well that I basically hid them from myself. Stumbled across this one this evening and after a screamer of a workday and a stress binge of too much junk, I could use a gentle wind-down.

This is a finely balanced combo: little mint, little floral, little sweetness from the stevia, nothing too bitter in the herbs. We’ll see how it does on the snooze factor, but regardless, I’m not sharing with Tazo. He gets to sleep 12 hours a day as it is.

Nicole

Mine just aren’t interested in tea. Strawberries, watermelon, cantaloupe… yes. Just not when it’s in tea.

gmathis

Yep, first thing when he came in the room was jump on my lap and stick his nose in my mug :)

Veronica

My cat is interested in my husband’s scotch. Any time he drinks some she tries to stick her head in the glass. It’s funny and alarming at the same time.

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85

This is a delicious, fruity tea. I like it with milk and sugar or honey.

Flavors: Apricot, Cream

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 2 min, 30 sec 3 tsp 24 OZ / 709 ML

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83

Although this Orange Spice tea is great by itself, I can’t help but fantasize about how it would taste with cocao nibs (mmm chocolate + orange + cinnamon-spice flavors =delicious!). I have also considered how well it would taste with vanilla or almond. I finally got my chance to try blending this with some Gong Fu Tea’s Absolute Almond black tea in my cupboard, and boy, it was an absolute hit! I mixed 1 teaspoon of the Orange Spice with 1 heaping teaspoon of Absolute Almond in a 2-cup pot, and voila…magic! The resulting tea was pretty darn perfect: the almond flavor melded well, coming through beautifully but still allowing some spice to mingle and tingle on the tongue. No one flavor dominated too much over the others. The taste was pleasant, warm, bright, nutty, rich, and filling. (I had resolved beforehand to only drink one cup and save the other for Hubby, but that resolve melted away completely and I HAD to finish the second cup too.) Oh. So. Good. This is such a deliciously flavorful and smooth black blend that I can just imagine how wonderful it would be as a morning eye-opener or with breakfast; perfect in the afternoon for a pick-me-up after being out in the cold; perfect in the evening with a sweet dessert…and so on. No matter what the time of day, mixed with the Almond, the Orange Spice is a good and satisfying all-around winter treat! Yum! I only wish I could have tried mixing those two teas earlier so I could have been enjoying this all winter long—bummer! Now I don’t have too much of the Orange Spice left and I will not be ordering more until fall. I guess I will just have to treasure what I have now, and then keep this in mind for a definite re-order next autumn.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 5 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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92

I don’t typically feel the need to write more than one tasting note per tea unless something different strikes me or (as in this case) I just feel like it. Contrary to what my absence of commentary on Steepster might suggest, I have actually been quite busy drinking and enjoying my teas of late. With spring coming just around the corner, I have been working on using up my “winter teas” in order to make room for the influx of new spring delights that await me. (I make that sound like a chore, but believe me, “using up tea” is no tedious obligation that I feel I must do…it’s a pleasure!) So, one of the teas in my winter collection is this English Breakfast, and I will be sorry when it is gone because I absolutely love it. It’s just one of those perfectly solid reliable black teas that you never get tired of, you know? Like that favorite sweater you wear (probably too often) in winter, but it doesn’t matter because it fits perfectly, feels comfortable, looks nice, is just the right color, and is suitable no matter what the occasion. That is this tea. Mmmmm, delicious! But, like my favorite sweaters, once summer comes this will be out of sight for a while until next year when I reorder for winter again.

Now, some of you may say, why can’t you just enjoy it in summer too? Well, I have weird ideas about what teas I like to drink and when. Not that it’s a hard and fast rule of course, but generally speaking I like certain teas at certain seasons. Black tea I generally drink heavily in the fall and winter, whereas greens, oolongs, and white teas all are what I consider “warmer weather teas.” I love black tea a lot though, so obviously I would never stop drinking it altogether just because it’s summer—I simply have different black teas I like to enjoy then. (For instance, I tend to choose Indian and African black varieties for summer, China blacks in winter, for no other reason than a good Nilgiri or Kenyan black seem “summerish” to me. Somehow they just fit with the hot weather, maybe because their countries of origin are typically super hot? Seems silly, I know, but that’s how I roll.) Anyway, here’s to sipping down some of my lovely fall/winter black teas: Lapsang Souchong, English Breakfast, Emporer’s Gold, Orange Spice, etc.!

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 5 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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83

Mild, mellow, loamy, with a touch of nutty-ness like acorns. It makes me think of lazy late summer afternoons spent near hidden forest streams.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 4 OZ / 133 ML

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93

I am fairly picky about my teas. I want to be able to enjoy them without all the additives of sugar, honey or cream so the bare flavor has to stand on its own. And this one does. I usually like orange pekoe tea by twinings but needed something I could enjoy in bulk without the paper bag flavor and cost. Not to mention, these are ORGANIC! Mountain Rose Herbs sell their tea by the pound. I ordered the 8 oz size first and went back and ordered the pound. If you are a person that likes that roasted tannin flavor without a lot of other added flavors, you will like this.

Smell: smells like old wood growth bark.
Taste: time or sun roasted flavor leaves that have been hiding in the forest undergrowth for quite a while. Slightly fermented flavor as well but not overwhelming. More like a slightly fermented leaf flavor that has been hiding under layers of leaves in the forest.
Color: Amber
Time I prefer to steep: 8 minutes (directions say 4 minutes)
Water: I use water from my well and it is 165 degree.
Brewing system: I use a For Life brew and a ceramic teapot.
Additive: I sometime add raw honey.

Flavors: Earth, Mineral, Tannin, Wood

Preparation
160 °F / 71 °C 8 min or more 2 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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87
drank Kukicha by Mountain Rose Herbs
61 tasting notes

This tea hits the spot on on cold winter days. Warm and wonderfully roasty-toasty, this relaxing, “feel good” tea is perfect for when one wants to hit hibernation mode and curl up like a cocoon in a blanket to doze the afternoon away. (Of course, few people actually have the luxury of doing this, but in theory, if it was possible to spend an uninterrupted afternoon snoozing, this is what one would drink!) Although, as we all know, black teas are also absolutely perfect for cold winter days, I think of those as more of a pick-me-up, energizing, get-the-blood-flowing kind of beverage. This kukicha, on the other hand, has the nice mellow roasted flavor like some oolongs and even some blacks, but without the boldness and kick that many of those will give you. I believe I have heard it is a little lower in caffeine too. Thus this tea will lead you gently into a satisfying state of snug, cozy, contentedness. Aaaaahhhh…so nice.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 5 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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Looks a little like salad dry in the pouch…definitely a woodsy flavor to it (drnking it with a chocolate chip cookie remedied any valerian mulchiness). So far I haven’t met a tisane that will put me out completely on its own—will have to report later on any possible zzzzz effect.

ashmanra, I put Tazo outside so I didn’t have any help steeping it :)

Anna

The word ‘pouch’ always makes me think of kangaroos, so it’s always very weird when I see it in other contexts. I just wanted to get that off my chest.

gmathis

Language is a funny thing. Packet, then :)

Anna

Haha, nooo, ‘pouch’ is fully legitimate in this context, and I LIKE thinking about kangaroos. Keep pouchin’!

ashmanra

Well, did you sleep? :)

gmathis

Ended up supplementing with a Tylenol PM due to a headache, so that sort of messed up the integrity of the experiment…

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69

I had this tea again this morning and found it to be much more smooth and mellow than the last time I tried it. It seems as though the vanilla flavor has been able to meld better with the Assam. I brewed it the same way I did the last time, so maybe the difference is that it takes a while for the vanilla essence to totally seep into the tea? Regardless, it was good. Not perfect, but still enjoyable. The sweet vanilla seemed to tame the boldness of the Assam, making it a good balance of flavors, yet it was not too dessert-like.

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 5 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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drank Forests Tea by Mountain Rose Herbs
1693 tasting notes

This came with two other Mountain Rose tea samples from ashmanra with a beautiful springy, yellow card. I set the card and packets out on the kitchen table to enjoy and I nearly had to to wrestle the tea packets away from Tazo. He was on the table (which he never is) sniffing and pawing away at them! Not sure which of the three teas made him so excitable, but I wasn’t about to experiment further, or I would have none for myself!

Never had a tisane with oak bark in it. Not one I’d pick to drink for pleasure, necessarily, but the spices and licorice made it passable.

Medicinal value on this one—jury’s still out. It takes a hammer over the head to knock me out. I don’t think “hammer” was in the ingredient list, so I wasn’t deeply unconscious all night. That’s OK—I have two more blends to try!

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